Chatham and PCWP Discuss Trump at Post-Election Panel

Author: Atiya Irvin-Mitchell

Unpredictable. Traumatic. Discriminatory. Unprecedented. Those are the words alumnae, students, and faculty have used to describe the impending Trump Administration. In the days that followed the news of who the country’s next president would be, waves of shock and disappointment were felt throughout Chatham’s campus. President Finegold sent a campus-wide email of reassurance, some took the day off, the Carriage House’s lounge became a designated safe space; but life goes on.

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The Case for Thanksgiving

Author: Ross Hsu

Thanksgiving is complicated. In its modern form, the holiday is almost entirely secular, and pretty indistinguishable from other harvest festivals around the world, aside from the distinctly American food and football. Thanksgiving is also a historical account, and an amalgam of different holidays and traditions, and, on the whole, is a myth. But it’s a good myth.

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Women’s Basketball Starts the Season with a Victory

Author: Jack Ridenour

Basketball season is back, and the women’s team continued their winning ways in the first game of the season. On Tuesday November 15, the Cougars defeated the Franciscan University Barons from Steubenville, Ohio by a score of 71-58. The Cougars were led by sophomore guard Katie Sieg with 12 points; junior guard Megan Sieg and sophomore guard Ashley McClain each scored 11 points.

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Chatham Students Respond to Trump Win with Fear and Apprehension

Author: Angela Billanti

Chatham students reflected on Donald Trump’s victory in the days following the 2016 election results.

“I think people are coming to terms with it a little more,” said Brooke Scheider, senior Biology major.  Scheider believes we cannot change the results at this point. When she found out about Trump’s victory, she felt scared, and does not remember any other election having this kind of impact on her or others.  

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Women’s Soccer Loses Last Game of Season, But Team is Hopeful For the Future

Author: Jack Ridenour

On November 2, the Women’s Soccer team finished their season with a loss against the Thomas More College Saints, in the first game of the playoffs. The Saints came into the game 9-0 in conference play and 20-0-1 in the season, and first in the conference. The Cougars entered the contest 6-3 in conference play, an overall record of 11-5-2 and fourth in the conference.

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Election Night

Photo: Chatham students prepare to settle in for a long night at the Carriage House for the Election Watch Party.
Photo Credit: Kaylee Spitak

Author: Ross Hsu

Donald J. Trump won the United States presidential election early Wednesday morning, following a much closer race than news outlets and pollsters predicted. Shortly into Tuesday night, much of Hillary Clinton’s “firewall,” swing states that the democrat’s campaign expected to win, were won by Trump, widening Trump’s path and narrowing hers.

People are protesting in cities across the nation, with thousands taking to the streets to demonstrate against the election of a man who has made countless racist, bigoted and misogynistic comments throughout his campaign.

At Chatham University, the mood at the Carriage House watch party changed from excited to tense as the race became closer and closer. Cheers followed confirmation of Clinton wins, but boos for Donald Trump became stunned silences as the possibility of a Trump win set in.

Jenna McGreevy, a sophomore and the president of Chatham’s College Democrats, explained that she was worried but not surprised. “I was suspicious of lots of the polls,” she said. “The demo Trump tapped into don’t interact or vocalize…they are a silent majority. I’m surprised the media didn’t expect it.”

Still, McGreevy was hopeful. “I’m hoping there are more uncounted votes who love America and are better than hatred,” she said as Clinton’s chances slimmed.

As Tuesday night wore on, words like “bleak,” “difficult” and “narrow” were used on election night broadcasts to describe Clinton’s path to 270 electoral college votes. Most panel discussions on the major news networks spent the night discussing their astonishment at the repudiation of polls and predictions for a Clinton win. Articles and news pieces are continuing to analyze the media’s failure. Many journalists and analysts are pointing to voters who claimed they were undecided or voting for third party candidates that ended up voting for Trump. This phenomenon has been called the Shy Tory Factor, in which polled voters are embarrassed or reluctant to report their support for a disliked candidate.

Teri Bradford, a junior and the president of Chatham Student Government, was stunned by the surprise results, lamenting the logic of Trump voters who dislike both candidates. “If you’re choosing between two things you don’t want, why would you choose the one that’s absolutely awful?” she asked. “I just don’t understand.”

Chatham’s home state of Pennsylvania ended up being a closer race than it has been since 1988, a surprise that defies its reputation as a swing state that has voted democrat in the last six elections, but also as a key part of Clinton’s supposed blue wall which all but fell apart Tuesday night. The last time PA voted Republican was 1988.

Post-election analysis shows that Trump won the state mainly through rural turnout in the southwestern precincts, and a lower urban democratic turnout than expected. Trump won many areas by a wider margin than President Obama had in the same regions.

Sophomore Sophie Kerensky was worried about the future as the race narrowed. “I’m just in shock,” the Social Work major said. “Regardless of the outcome, this is dangerous.”

Clinton, Trump and President Obama all spoke Wednesday in a succession of statements responding to the results.

Clinton called her loss “painful,” but urged supporters to accept the result of the election. “We owe him an open mind and a chance to lead,” she said. Obama echoed her call for unity, saying that “we are all on the same team.” The president said he was heartened by his early morning call with Trump.

Even Donald Trump laid down his divisive rhetoric in his victory speech. “Now it’s time for America to bind the wounds of division,” he said. “It is time for us to come together as one united people.”

As the final states were called early Wednesday morning, the mood in the Carriage House was stunned and abysmal. Maryem Aslam, a Senior Biology major, shared the same reaction as many others at Chatham. “A part of my is still hoping new votes will be counted, or something will change,” she said. “I just never expected this.”

Chatham Interviewing Candidates for New Director of Multicultural Affairs Position

Photo: A poster in Anderson Dining Hall for Native American History Month. In the future, The Director of Multicultural Affairs will handle programming for this and other campus celebrations of diversity.

Credit: Ross Hsu

Author: Ross Hsu

Chatham is currently interviewing candidates for Director of Multicultural Affairs, a new position within Student Affairs that will implement events and dialogues to educate about and celebrate diversity.

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