August 2, 2014
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August Display: Card-Catalog-Craft-Corner

photo (1)

This was taken before I had coffee and realized that “shelf” had an “L” in it.

Welcome to August! Summer’s winding down and also somehow getting hotter. Luckily we have all these card catalog cards you can use to fan yourself with. You can also use them to make art, August is also national art appreciation month and that’s the theme of this month’s display.

We have some great library materials on display, mostly focused on crafts and thinking critically about art. But in the display, they are mostly a pretense to get everyone to  make art with our catalog cards!

So please, make some arts and/or crafts! Making art will surely help you appreciate the art of others!

 

Need some inspiration? Take a look at what some professional and amateur artists were able to do with library catalog cards:

University of Iowa Cartalog

American Craft Council, Library Card Project

Want to learn more about Art History and art Appreciation? Check out these Databases:

Art and Architecture 

ArtStor

Extra Credit:

You might also want to keep an eye out for notes created for the Random Note Project, or follow the Notes @ Chatham tumblr for notes found by others.

Fossil Record

“Fossil Record” by yours truly

 

July 1, 2014
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Having trouble accessing your favorite database?

interrobangsmallHi there! So today was the big switch from Ovid to EBSCO for the following databases:

  • EBM Reviews (renamed Cochrane Collection)
  • Medline
  • PsycINFO (including PsycArticles)
  • SocINDEX (replaced Social Work Abstracts)

 

As we work to update our links to these databases on the Library website, here’s a (relatively) easy way to access these databases.

 

  1. From JKM’s homepage, click Databases A-Z underneath the search toolbar
  2. Click the link for “Academic Search Premier” (It’s the first one-can’t miss it!)
  3. Above the EBSCOHost search bar, click the “Choose Databases” link (Pictured)asp
  4. Un-select Academic Search Premier and choose the database(s) that you’d like to search
  5. Tah-dah!

 

Soon enough, you’ll be able to search through your chosen database(s).

Thank you for your patience, and best of luck with your research!

June 8, 2014
by library
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America: History and Life, June’s Database of the Month

Ever wanted to do any research about anything that involves the United States and Canada? If so, you ought to know about  EBSCOHost’s America: History and Life.

The portraits of Daniel Shays and Job Shattuck, leaders of Shay’s Rebellion. This rebellion was in response to economic trouble of the 1780s and is seen as a potential cause of the replacement of the Articles of Confederation with the United States Constitution.

Attention students and faculty in: African American Studies, Art History, Cultural Studies, Economics, Education, Environmental Science, Environmental Studies, Global Policy Studies, History, International Studies, Law & Society, Media Arts, Policy Studies, Political Science, Public Policy Studies, Social Services Administration,Women’s Studies

AND MORE (I’m sure I’m missing at something)

America: History and Life bills itself as “The Definitive Database for the Past and Present of The United States and Canada”. With full-text coverage of over 260 journals and 80 books, indexing and abstracting of thousands of additional titles- including english abstracts of foreign-language articles, book review, and detailed, searchable reference, you gotta admit they have a point.

The database will look very familiar to those who have used EBSCOHost databases in the past. A nice feature of EBSCOHost is that you can search multiple databases simultaneously. Depending on what you are searching for, America: History and Life would likely pair nicely with many other databases, including Academic Search Premier, Communication & Mass Media Complete, Environment Complete, Military & Government Collection, Newspaper Source, and World History Collection.

Canadian Women wearing plastic face protection from snowstorms in Montreal, 1939. While this image is of little historical significance to Canada, it sure looks cool.

Once you’ve selected the databases you want to search, I would go straight to the advanced search feature, where you can find material by Title, author, subject, or look for phrases within the abstract or the full text. Another wonderful feature of America: History and Life is the many ways to you can limit your search. A simple click, and you can make sure that everything your search returns is the full article or book. It’s just as easy to limit your search by publication year, type of material, (A book versus an article versus a book review, for example) make sure your results are peer-reviewed, or look for publications that include images or graphs.

One thing about America: History and Life that disappoints this reviewer is a lack of primary sources. The database focuses on scholarly material of the late 20th century. While it’s great to know your strengths, even especially if you are a database- the researcher should keep in mind that resources you will find in America: History and Life are most likely secondary or tertiary, and will work best when combined with primary resources. Some places to look for great primary resources include:

The Chatham University Archives

Accessible Archives

The National Archives

The Library of Congress American Memory Project

EBSCOHost’s Newspaper Source

Fordham University Modern History Full Text Resources

 

Articles of (potential) interest from America:History and Life

Quigel, James P. “Steel and Steelworkers: Race and Class Struggle in Twentieth-Century Pittsburgh (Book).” Journal Of American History 90, no. 2 (September 2003): 729-731.

Smith, Michael B. 2001. “‘SILENCE, MISS CARSON!’ SCIENCE, GENDER, AND THE RECEPTION OF ‘SILENT SPRING’.” Feminist Studies 27, no. 3: 733.

May 31, 2014
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From Page to Screen Results (A Post of Lists)

Erich Von Stroher’s 1925’s “Greed” was the first motion picture made based upon a book. It is rumored that the director wanted to be as true to the book as possible, and the director’s original cut was nine and a half hours long.

Summertime is the time for relaxation and enjoyment- but we know better than that. Now that you don’t need to worry about answering questions that your professors are asking, you can ask some questions of your own. Big questions, nothing but the most pressing, most important questions- the ones that can keep you up late into the night.

Why are we here?

What are my responsibilities to the human race, the earth, the universe?

Is death the end? Is anything irreparable?

Is the book always better than the movie?

Recently, we asked you what was your favorite book that had been turned into a movie and we got an awful lot of different and interesting responses; running the Gambit from new, popular books and movies, like The Hunger Games and The Diary of a Wimpy Kid to classic pairings like Pride and Prejudice and The Count of Monte Cristo. Many of the books, and some of the movies we have here at the library!

 

The following lists encapsulate what you’ve written as your favorite books that have been turned into movies (or your favorite movies based on books). Hopefully these resources can help you in answering the question, Is the book always better?

Favorite Pairings that the Library has both versions of

Lord of the Rings Trilogy

Book-The Lord of the Rings

 DVD- The Lord of the Rings Trilogy

To Kill a Mockingbird

Book

DVD

 

Listed items we have the Book for

The Hobbit

Pride and Prejudice

Downloadable E-Book

The Hunger Games Series

The Hunger Games

Catching Fire

Mocking Jay

Harry Potter Series

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

Great Gatsby

The Watchman

Wise Blood

Persuasion

Schindler’s List

The Perks of Being A Wallflower

The Virgin Suicides

Ghost World

Snow White

The Count of Monte Cristo

Twilight

1984

Alice in Wonderland

Life of Pi

One Flew over the Cuckoo’s nest

Stories we have the movie version of, but not the book

The Godfather

 

Other favorites (As a temporary or full-time resident of Pittsburgh, you’ll likely be able to gain access to many of these titles through the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh System)

Diary of a Wimpy Kid

The Princess Bride

The World According to Garp

The Shining

Howls Moving Castle

Whip It/Derby Girl

Never Let Me Go

Time Travelers Wife

The Host

The Fog

The Golden Compass

The Children of Men

Half of a Yellow Sun

50 Shades of Grey

A Walk to Remember

How to Train your Dragon

 

Here are some other book/movie pairing we have that were not mentioned

Dirt: The Ecstatic Skin of the Earth

Dirt! The movie

Ben Hur: A Tale of The Christ (Book)

Ben Hur: Film (Movie)

Jurassic Park

Jurassic Park (Movie)

The Lord of the Flies

The Lord of the Flies (Movie)

The Odyssey

O Brother, Where Art Thou (A Loose adaptation)

Sense and Sensibility

The Wonderful Wizard of OZ

The Wizard of OZ

Zorba the Greek

Zorba the Greek (Movie)

Movies at the JKM Library that you may not have known were originally based on books

American Splendor

Blade Runner

I, Robot

The Basketball Diaries

The Graduate

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen

Mystic River

The Notebook

Practical Magic

Seabiscuit

 

 

Upcoming movies based on books we have here at Chatham

The Fault in Our Stars

The Giver

Gone Girl

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day

Thérèse Raquin

A Book of Common Prayer

Far from the Maddening Crowd

April 12, 2014
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Explore the World With Global Road Warrior

Summer Residence of the King of Thailand

Summer Residence of the King of Thailand

Are you travelling the world this summer? Or do you just wish you were? Either way, April’s database of the month, Global Road Warrior is an informative, and dare I say- fun database for you to explore.

Global Road Warrior was created by the World Trade Press, a company devoted to providing up-to-date information and media to researchers, travelers, educators, and professionals. Their hope is to facilitate better global understanding.

Global Road Warrior accomplishes this with a great breadth of knowledge and information about most of the world’s nations. This database includes information about business culture, travel tips, security briefing, human rights reports, popular recipes, translations of common words and phrases into 36 languages.

There are a few ways to search this database. Selecting a specific country from the drop-down list or finding it on the world map will probably be most useful for most of your needs. Once you are on a country’s page you will find information about the land, people, history, and current condition of the nation in question- with a sidebar where you will find links to much more information.

From the homepage you can also search for words or phrases in one particular page or across the entire database. The later could be useful if you have a very specific phrase that you’d like to compare across nations- but it usually returns too many results.

Although a few smaller island nations seem to be excluded, Global Road Warrior has no small amount of information on 176 countries from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe. With Global Road Warrior, you can pretend you’re traveling the world even if you can’t afford it- and doesn’t that sound like more fun than yet another Netflix marathon?

April 8, 2014
by library
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5 Ways that the Library Will Help You Survive Finals

Believe it or not, Summer is just around the corner. But before you can relax, vacation, and have your parents do your laundry, you still have papers to write, presentations to make, and exams to take. It’s rough, but no need to stress out too much- we’re here to help. Here are some of the ways that the library can make finals a little bit more bearable.

Sleeping Student

Unfortunately, beds are not something that we provide.

Late nights: During finals you might have some pretty late nights, and we’ll stay up late with you. April 21st, 22nd, and 23rd, the library will be open until 2am. If you really want to break the dawn, feel free to use the 24 hour computer lab located in the library entrance.

Study rooms: It can be hard to focus in your room, The Jennie King Mellon Library offers group and individual study rooms you can use to write papers, finalize presentations, and study. During finals group study rooms are very popular, so we suggest that you book them in advance by stopping by the library circulation desk or emailing circdesk@chatham.edu. Individual rooms can be borrowed for 4 hours, but no reservations are allowed- they are first-come, first-served.

Research Help: As always, we are here to help you with your research. We’ll help you find that article on Art-Deco architecture by that guy who’s name starts with H, or the best places to find primary sources to find a primary source. Stop by the reference desk, email jkmref@chatham.edu, call us, send us an instant message through our website, or text us at 724-919-4645 and we’ll be happy to assist.

Citation and Writing: Often the worst part of writing that big paper is worrying about getting your sources cited just right. We have a collection of resources on just about any citation style you need to work with as well as information about when and where to cite, and how to avoid plagiarism. Need someone to look over your bibliography or your whole paper? Make an appointment at the PACE Center on the third floor and have someone review your work.

Blowing off steam: So finals are over and you have some time to kill? Or maybe you’ll go crazy if you have to study for one more minute? Don’t worry- we can help! Did you know that your library is also a library? We have a variety of popular books and movies you can unwind with- Maybe a viewing of Pixar’s Brave will help you be just that.

So while you’re burning that midnight oil, and writing what feels like endless papers don’t forget your library. Whether you’re in the library itself or studying from the comfort of your own home, we’ll be here with ways to make your life a little bit easier.

 

March 22, 2014
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Database Review: Counseling and Therapy in Video

Counseling and Therapy in Video

  • Has 356 videos totaling  409 hours of content

  • Includes real and staged counseling sessions along with lectures and presentations by renowned therapists

  • Includes expert commentary on staged counseling sessions

  • Has a great advanced search feature, and each video has a searchable transcript

  • Allows you to create your own video compilations and add annotations

  • Is a great resource for students and faculty in psychology, social work, integrative health studies, and education

counseling-99740_640

Counseling and Therapy in Video is exactly what it sounds like- a database of videos related to counseling and therapy. Site resources include lectures by and interviews with renowned therapists as well as real and scripted therapy sessions. Many of the counseling footage is blended with commentary and consultations, where scenes are cut with advice and analysis by an expert therapist.

The best way to access this database (other than the link at the top of this post) is by clicking “Databases A-Z” under the “Articles and Databases” tab on the home page. Counseling and Therapy in Video is the second to last of the databases that start with C. This database can also be found in the Psychology subject guide under the “Find Articles” tab.

Once in the Database you can browse the videos by subject, theme, or video type. If you have a specific idea of what you are looking for, you should click the “Advanced Search” button beneath the header. In advanced search, you can search by title, subject, and date, but you can also search the transcripts of the videos, or narrow down your results by the gender, and race the therapist or the age, gender, race, and sexual orientation of the client. This could be particularly useful if you are seeking counseling resources specific to particular groups.

Each video has a detailed, searchable transcript, along with a brief abstract. What’s even more exciting is that the video interface gives the viewer the ability to make clips from the video, and combine clips and videos into annotated playlists. Combined with the video embed feature, the ability to make and share clips can be a great tool for including brief, relevant audiovisual elements to classroom projects easily and seamlessly.

If you need help with Counseling and Therapy In Video, or any of the library’s database, please do not hesitate to come to the library, if you don’t want to come over, feel free to e-mail the reference desk, or Psychology Liaison Librarian, Kate Wenger.

 

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