All posts by k.emory

Updates from the International Student Services offices

 

Traveling over winter break? Be prepared!

Study in the States, the official website for international students in the US has released their tips for students planning to travel over winter break. This information is helpful for international travel, regardless on when you go.

  1. Meet with your designated school official (DSO).

The DSO will confirm your student status and sign your I-20 for Travel authorization. They will confirm your current address, contact information, and enrollment.

  1. Don’t forget all the required documents for travel!

Remember to take your passport, valid student visa, and your form I-20 when you travel. Make sure these documents are kept close at hand, and not put in checked baggage. It may also be a good idea to bring a copy of your enrollment verification- which you can print from your MyChatham account.

  1. What if you receive a Form I-515A?

First, don’t panic! The Form I-515A is issued by Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) if you are missing required documentation. It allows you to entire the US for 30-days in order to obtain and submit the missing documentation. If you receive a Form I-515A, contact your DSO immediately.

Read the full article at Study in the States .

A tragedy in Pittsburgh

On October 27, eleven people were killed as they worshiped at the Synagogue.

The Tree of Life Synagogue is just across the street from Chatham’s south entrance. The killings have forever changed Pittsburgh and the Squirrel Hill communities.  Grief and sadness still permeate.

“Stronger than Hate” signs are in front of people’s houses. Students stoically wear “Chatham is stronger than hate” t-shirts.  A sticker with the same message is on my office door.

Doing weekend shopping, I drove past the synagogue a couple of times.

Gone are the outdoor memorials. They have been moved indoors to create a permanent place of remembrance at the Tree of Life.

People are still gathering at the Synagogue. Some stand on the street corner, heads bowed in silent prayer. Others are taking pictures of the building. A stillness can still be felt in the area.

Deterring hatred. The work we do as international educators is important, I might even say vital.

Through international education and exchange, participating students learn a lot about their host country. They learn about their own countries as seen and understood by outsiders. They learn about themselves—their values, beliefs, strengths and weaknesses.  Students who participate in study abroad programs teach their hosts about their home countries.

Through international exchange, we come to learn about the range of human differences. We learn about race, ethnicity, gender identity, physical abilities, national origins, political beliefs, and religious and ethical values systems.

People-to-people diplomacy, learning about yourself and others, deters hatred.  Makes us stronger than hate.

Written by AVP Chris Musick, International Affairs

North Shore Tour with the OIA

On Saturday March 24, students joined the OIA (Office of International Affairs) for the Spring Neighborhood Tour. Each semester, the OIA takes students to a different Pittsburgh neighborhood to showcase local culture and activities, and to encourage students to explore the city on their own.

Students met at the Chatham Chapel, and we took the city bus to Wood Street in Downtown.  From there students boarded the “T”- Pittsburgh’s own light rail system. The T is free within the downtown area, and can be used to travel to PNC Park, Heinz Field, and the Carnegie Science Center. The group walked along the Allegheny River from PNC Park to the Fred Rogers Memorial. Mr. Rogers is one of the most famous Pittsburghers, known for the children’s program “Mr. Rogers Neighborhood”.

From there, we made our way to Allegheny Commons Park, and to the Mexican War Streets area of the North Shore. This area is full of Victorian-era row homes, gardens, and alleyways. It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

The tour ended at the Mattress Factory, the premier museum in Pittsburgh for contemporary art. Students had the option to tour the Mattress Factory or go off on their own. One group made its way to Randyland, located around the block form the Mattress Factory to explore the quirky artists’ welcoming space.

Interested in Pittsburgh? Let the OIA know which neighborhood you want to explore! Our next adventure will take place in Summer 2018.

Contact us at InternationalAffairs@chatham.edu

International Exchange Club – Beach Party Dance

The International Exchange club is an opportunity for International and American students to come together and learn about each other’s culture while creating friendships. The club held a kick-off dance on March 23rd with a “beach party” theme.  Club members were asked to submit their favorite songs from around the world, and the dance featured music in many languages.

Interested in joining the IEC? Contact InternationalAffairs@chatham.edu

Study in the States and helpful immigration reminders

The Department of Homeland Security launched the “Study in the States” website over a year ago. The goal of the site is to provide innovated information for the many different shareholders for international students in the United States. This includes updates and information from: the Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP), U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and the Department of State’s Bureau of Consular Affairs and Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. The main site can be found at: https://studyinthestates.dhs.gov/

The Office of International Affairs encourages prospective, current, and former Chatham University students to visit the site frequently to keep updated on immigration matters.

Recently, Study in the States updated their blog with some good information for Chatham Students:

Students: Passing Final Exams Helps You Maintain Status

November 23, 2016

With winter break approaching and academic terms ending, many students are preparing for their final exams. As an international student, it’s important to understand that studying for and passing your final exams helps you maintain your status.

Maintaining status means following the rules and regulations that govern studying in the United States, and these rules require that you enroll in a full course of study and pass all your classes. Since your performance on a final exam contributes to your overall grade in a course, it’s important to do well on the exams to pass your classes. Following these study tips can help you prepare:

  • Do not simply re-read your notes. Focus on the meaning of what you’ve written.
  • Ask yourself a lot of questions.
  • Connect new information to something you already know.
  • Draw out information in a visual form (e.g., diagrams and illustrations).
  • Use flashcards to help you memorize information.
  • Do not wait until the last minute to study.

If you have questions about maintaining status or concerns about passing your classes, talk with your designated school official (DSO) immediately. Your DSO is the best person to help you navigate your options while ensuring you properly maintain your status.

(At Chatham University, the Primary Designated School Official is Ms. Kate Emory. She can be contacted at K.Emory@chatham.edu or by phone at 412-365-1267)

The original blog post can be found at: https://studyinthestates.dhs.gov/2016/11/students-passing-final-exams-helps-you-maintain-status