March 30, 2020
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Virtual Chatham Archives: A Survey of What’s Online

Since COVID-19 was declared a pandemic by the WHO on March 11th, 2020, life in America has changed significantly. The impact has been felt locally in many ways, with many people working from home and practicing social distancing.  In this environment, the online access provided through the Chatham University Archives becomes an even greater research tool.

The Chatham University Archives has many collections—including many publications created by the university—available to the public on the Web (library.chatham.edu/archives or click here) and we’re happy to share some guidance on searching these materials.

What Do We Have? An Overview:

This screenshot shows where you can access the collections on the Archives page – the particular collections I will highlight below are circled in red.

Commencement Programs

  • This collection contains documentation of commencement exercises held at Chatham University between 1870 and the present, including both undergraduate and graduate degree conferral ceremonies (Access the collection here)

Chatham College: The First Ninety Years

  • A book published in 1960 by Chatham history professor and historian Laberta Dysart, detailing Chatham’s history until that point. (Access the collection here)

Yearbooks (1915-2010)

  • This collection contains scanned images of Chatham’s yearbooks from 1915-2010 – a great source of information for campus life and events, as well as information about former Chatham students. (Access the collection here)

Course Catalogs

  • Scanned images and digital archives of course catalogs from 1870-2019 – this would be great for anyone interested in what courses Chatham offered historically. (Access the collections by clicking on the date range you’re looking for: 1870-1991, 2006-2014, 2016-2019)

Alumnae Directories (select volumes)

  • Contact information for Chatham alumnae – a great resource if you’re wanting to find out if someone went to Chatham, but better for genealogical research because the most recent one available online is from 1956. (Access the collection here)

Alumnae Recorder

  • Alumnae newsletters sent out to Chatham alumnae, detailing news from classmates and other pertinent information for Chatham alumnae to know. (Access the collection here)

Minor Bird

Student Handbooks

  • Selected volumes of the handbooks given to students at the start of every school year, detailing rules and regulations. Some of them even have interesting tidbits of Chatham history and folklore, like ghost stories! (Access the collection here)

Student Newspapers

  • Student newspapers dating as far back as the late 1800s. These are a fantastic source of information for not only what was going on at Chatham at the time, but on occasion the greater Pittsburgh area and the world. The newspapers also contain advertisements from local Pittsburgh businesses, enabling a researcher to learn about some historic Pittsburgh businesses. (Access the collection by clicking on the date range you’re looking for: 1895-1903, 1903-1921, 1921-1923, 1923-1934, 1934-1939, 1939-1948, 1949-2018)

The Dilworthian

  • Earlier in Chatham’s history, back when it was Pennsylvania Female College and Pennsylvania College for Women, there was a school called Dilworth Hall that was considered a feeder school for the college. The Dilworthian is their quarterly publication, like a student newspaper, written by their students (who could be considered high school students). (Access the collection here)

How can I access these materials?

All these materials are either held on one of two online platforms, the Internet Archive or Artstor. Coming very soon, we will have video tutorials giving a more detailed overview of how to use each of these. For now, though, here is a helpful tip to get started.

Materials on the Internet Archive are keyword searchable using the search box that has a black background and says “Search inside.” Using the search box with a white background will search all the items in the Internet Archive, rather than the yearbook, course catalog, or student newspaper you selected.

It is also important to think about the terms or keywords to enter into the search box.  A good rule of thumb for the search bar is the mantra “less is more.” For example, rather than searching “sledding on campus,” try “sledding” or “sled.” Keep in mind that search results will be drawn from the text in the volume, not the pictures. So, a picture of students sledding on campus will only be returned from a search for “sled” if there is a caption (or other text) that has the word “sled.”

For searching names, the simplicity principle also applies.  Try searching an individual’s last name, rather than the first and last names together.  This way, the search returns will show listings for “Jane Smith” as well as for “Smith, Jane.”  Also, if you’re looking up a name, make sure you have the correct spelling – the search function shows no mercy for spelling errors!

The above image shows what happens when search results appear. You’ll see the search term that was used in the green circle. The blue arrows (one of which is circled in yellow) show where that term appears in the document. If you hover your cursor over a blue arrow, a box like the one circled in orange will appear – it gives you a slight preview of how the search term is used on that page. When you click on a blue arrow and arrive on the specified page, the search term will also be highlighted in purple – areas where this is present in the image are also highlighted with orange circles.

We hope that this resource overview will help you as you continue to conduct research using the primary source documents.  We’re developing a video series to provide additional guidance on using archival resources in remote research.  Check out the first in the series below and check out our Youtube channel for all the latest.

If you have any questions, feel free to use the chat box on the library’s home page to speak to the reference librarian on duty or contact Archivist and Public Services Librarian Molly Tighe directly at mtighe1@chatham.edu.

March 17, 2020
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Our Virtual Services FAQs

We at the JKM Library hope you’re all staying healthy and taking all necessary precautions to keep others healthy too. We know this is a stressful time, but the JKM Library’s librarians are here for you and your research needs! That being said, we are limited in how we can help. See the FAQ below, and if you still have questions, please reach out to us through the Ask a Librarian chat on our homepage or via email at reference@chatham.edu.

  • Can I get into the library building?
    • The library building is closed for the time being.
    • The 24/7 space is now also closed to the public. If you have an [urgent, immediate, pressing] need to access the 24/7 space, please complete the Computer Lab Access Request Form on myChatham -> Documents and Forms -> Residence Life -> JKM Library Computer Lab Access Request Form.
  • Can I access the University Archives?
    • Not physically, but the archives’ digital collections can be accessed on their website (https://library.chatham.edu/archives)!
    • You may also email your archives related questions to Archivist Molly Tighe at m.tighe@chatham.edu
  • Can I use E-ZBorrow and/or ILLiad?
    • E-ZBorrow is no longer available at this time. ILLiad is available but limited. Our team is working on setting up remote functionality, and right now we’re working off of an automated system. To increase your chances of receiving your item, be sure to include the ISSN in your request form. Only digital items will be processed at this time, nothing physical.
  • Can I return my library items?
    • If you are graduating and are done with your items, please return them to the library via the drop box in the library vestibule if you are able. If you are graduating but have already left campus or if you will be returning to campus, you can return them by snail mail or in person once we reopen. If you have a question or concern, please reach out to Head of Access Services Kate Wenger (kwenger@chatham.edu).
  • Will I get fined due to Coronavirus related late items?
    • No. If you have any concerns about library items being overdue, please reach out to Head of Access Services Kate Wenger (kwenger@chatham.edu)
  • Can I schedule a research appointment?
    • Yes! Librarians are available to work with you one-on-one via Zoom. Please email your subject librarian or fill out this form to make an appointment.
  • Can I still do research?
    • Definitely! You have access to about 70 digital databases, almost over 750,000 full text eBooks, and over 85,000 full text eJournals.
    • You can search almost all of our digital content via the “All Resources” tab on our homepage.
    • You can search for our individual full text eJournals and ebooks via the “Search for eJournal Titles” button on the homepage.
    • You can search for individual databases alphabetically via our “Find Databases” button on our homepage.
    • See our Research Guides in your subject area or for things like primary sources and citation information via the “See Resources by Subject” button on our homepage.
  • Can I access physical books, journals, movies, or other items in the library?
    • No, unfortunately no physical items in the library building are available at this time.
  • Can I call the library and talk with a librarian?
    • Not right now, but you can email us or Zoom with us, or use our chat
  • Can I chat quickly with a librarian?
    • Absolutely! We will be monitoring our Ask a Librarian chat on our homepage during these hours:
      • 8:00 am – 10:00 pm Monday – Thursday
      • 8:00 am – 5:00 pm Friday
      • 1:00 pm – 7:00 pm Saturday
      • 12:00 pm – 10:00 pm Sunday

We hope this FAQ is helpful and that we can continue to assist you in all your academic endeavors! Please stay up-to-date on library offerings and announcements by checking our social media pages (@jkmlibrary and @chathamarchives on Instagram, library Facebook, archives Facebook) and our website regularly.

March 14, 2020
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JKM Library Moving to Virtual Services Exclusively

JKM Librarians are eager to continue to support faculty, students and staff as we experience the current move to virtual instruction. In keeping with current policy and out of an abundance of caution, librarians will provide remote services only. The library building will be closed for the time being, although at this time 24 hour space is still accessible.

Our Ask a Librarian chat service and Zoom will allow us to continue to provide reference, instruction and consultation services. We will continue to monitor the situation and post information on our home page. https://library.chatham.edu/friendly.php?s=home

We will staff the Ask a Librarian chat service during the following hours:

  • 8:00 am – 10:00 pm Monday – Thursday
  • 8:00 am – 5:00 pm Friday
  • 1:00 pm – 7:00 pm Saturday
  • 12:00 pm – 10:00 pm Sunday

Access our Ask a Librarian chat service on our home page: https://library.chatham.edu/friendly.php?s=home

The Archives and Special Collections will provide remote reference through email.

We have hundreds of thousands of eBooks, journals, and videos available in our databases and searchable from our home page. We can help you locate material that could perhaps substitute for print resources.

Librarians are available for consultations about classes and student support and can be reached by email (jkmref@chatham.edu) or by chat (Ask a Librarian)

We can provide instruction via Zoom.

If you have any items checked out, we suggest you hold on to them – due dates are flexible.

 

Take care and stay well,

Jill Ausel, Library Director

February 20, 2020
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Personal Digital Privacy Tools

As we live more and more of our lives on the Internet, it’s important to take personal digital privacy seriously. Hacking techniques can be very sophisticated, and a breech in your privacy can have devastating effects. Learning how to protect your data and your privacy online, as well as how to develop good digital hygiene, is becoming more and more important.

Last semester (fall 2019), we conducted an informal #BeCyberSmart survey of our patrons, asking which level of familiarity they have with personal digital privacy and which actions they take to protect their personal information online.

Patrons were asked to select a sticker color that corresponded with their knowledge level and place those stickers in the columns representing actions they have taken to protect their personal digital privacy. Below are the results of this interactive informal survey.

While most participants have indicated that they know at least a little bit about personal digital privacy and cybersecurity, there is always room for more knowledge! The more you know, the better able you are to protect yourself online. Below we’ve compiled a quick list of resources for you to use when going about a personal digital detox or increasing your personal digital privacy.

1) Use a password manager like Bitwarden or LastPass.

2) Go through the Data Detox Kit: https://datadetoxkit.org/en/home

  • From the website… “The Data Detox Kit’s clear suggestions and concrete steps help people harness all aspects of their online lives, making more informed choices and changing their digital habits in ways that suit them.”
  • Follow simple step-by-step guides to cleaning up your digital presence and locking down your digital privacy
  • Includes tips and tricks for how to maintain your privacy and good digital hygiene
  • Offers alternatives to popular apps that do not respect your privacy or pose threats to your privacy
  • Developed by Berlin-based organization called Tactical Tech in partnership with Mozilla

3) Swap out Google for DuckDuckGo: https://duckduckgo.com/

  • DuckDuckGo is a privacy-focused search engine that runs off of the same search index as Bing, which means it isn’t quite as intuitive as Google, but your information stays safe!
  • It does NOT track your searches
  • It has a very useful browser plug-in that will “grade” each website you visit in terms of how well that website will protect your personal digital information: https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/duckduckgo-for-firefox/
  • It blocks ads for you. We still recommend adding additional ad blockers (The Data Detox Kit has great suggestions)
  • When coupling DuckDuckGo with Firefox, you’re off to a good start in terms of protecting your privacy while using the Internet

4) Feeling really adventurous? Try out Brave Browser: https://brave.com/

  • From the website… “You deserve a better Internet. So we reimagined what a browser should be. It begins with giving you back power. Get unmatched speed, security and privacy by blocking trackers. Earn rewards by opting into our privacy-respecting ads and help give publishers back their fair share of Internet revenue.”
  • Brave goes beyond protecting your privacy. It revolutionizes how companies monetize their online presence and put that power in your hands. Instead of suffering through ads, you get to decide where your money goes. And if you decide you’re ok with ads, you get rewarded for it!
  • Brave does not collect your data and gives you incredible control over your own Internet experience

5) Visit the Electronic Frontier Foundation and read up on current affairs concerning personal digital privacy online and more: https://www.eff.org/issues/net-neutrality

  • From the website… “The Electronic Frontier Foundation is the leading nonprofit organization defending civil liberties in the digital world. Founded in 1990, EFF champions user privacy, free expression, and innovation through impact litigation, policy analysis, grassroots activism, and technology development. We work to ensure that rights and freedoms are enhanced and protected as our use of technology grows.”
  • They advocate for safe, secure, and equitable access to Internet resources for all
  • Take advantage of their numerous tools and additional resources to protect Internet users’ privacy: https://www.eff.org/pages/tools
  • Volunteer with the EFF and contribute even more!

September 26, 2018
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Interlibrary Loan: What It is and How to Use It

Here at the JKM Library, our librarians do their best to ensure that the collections and resources we provide fit your needs as students, faculty, and researchers. Our library’s stacks are home to over 144,000 physical books, magazines, print journals, DVDs/Blu-rays, CDs, and more. And through the library’s website, you also have access to electronic resources such as e-books, journals, magazines, and newspapers. Amazing, right?!

While this is a huge number of resources at your disposal, it’s likely that at one point or another throughout your Chatham career you will want to get ahold of something that is particularly unusual, hard-to-find, or simply beyond the scope of our collections as an academic library. Whether it’s because your thesis is on a fairly niche topic and you need to find sources for it, you’re looking for your textbooks for the new semester, or you were just hoping to read the latest YA release that hasn’t made its way to our Curriculum Collection shelves yet – whatever the reason, interlibrary loan can help you access the books, media, and articles that we just don’t have in our collections.

What is Interlibrary Loan?

It would be impractical, not to say virtually impossible, for a library to retain a copy of every single book ever published, so many libraries purchase books they anticipate that their patrons will use and then rely on interlibrary loan (ILL) to help bridge the gaps in their collections. ILL is a resource sharing service used by libraries all over the world that allows their users to borrow books, DVDs, music, articles, theses, and more from other libraries that they have formed cooperative agreements with. The best part is, at Chatham, this service is available to you completely free of charge! The library covers all normal shipping costs for interlibrary loan items.

We currently use two different systems to manage your interlibrary loan requests here: E-ZBorrow and ILLiad. Both are useful for finding different types of materials, though there are a few key differences between them and what you would want to use each system for, which we will explain here.

Continue Reading →

March 12, 2018
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Placing Holds on JKM Library Items

Ever found a great JKM library book while doing research from your dorm, office, or home? Wish you could have placed a hold on that item so you could pick it up later?

Well now you can!

Look for a link to “Place hold” when searching our library catalog via the Books+ tab on our website. When you are prompted to login, enter your Chatham username and password, and then you’ll be able to place a hold for the item. We will pull it from the shelves and hold it for you for 14 days.

Please be aware that if someone else finds the item on the shelf before we have a chance to pull it for you, they will be allowed to check it out.

Lastly, for items that are checked out or missing, use E-ZBorrow (for books) or ILLiad (for books not available in E-ZBorrow, as well as DVDs and CDs) to order them from other libraries instead of placing a hold. You’ll get them much faster that way.

Any questions? Ask a librarian!

August 31, 2016
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The 24/7 Lab – An Always-Open Study Space

If you need a place to study late at night after the Library closes, or if you need to print out your paper after finishing it at 2:00 AM, check out our 24/7 Lab!

24/7 Lab

24/7 Lab

The 24/7 Lab is a computer lab which is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.  It can be accessed via a door in the glass vestibule which can be opened using your student ID!

Entrance to the 24/7 Lab

Entrance to the 24/7 Lab

 

After the library closes at midnight (or at 7 PM on Fridays and Saturdays), the 24/7 Lab is extended from the one computer lab room to include Room 103, LCC1, and the large Library lab. This provides a variety of open tables and computer access as well as group study and individual spaces.

Room 103

Room 103

 

LCC1

LCC1

 

Library Lab 101

Library Lab 101

 

The nearest bathrooms to the 24/7 Lab are located in the Eddy Theater Lobby.  For your comfort and convenience, the Eddy Theater Lobby will be open. The Eddy doors nearest the Library will remain unlocked as well as the wheelchair accessible entrance on the other side of the building.

Eddy Theater Lobby Entrance

Eddy Theater Lobby Entrance

We hope that the 24/7 Lab proves to be useful to you!  Happy studying and be brilliant!

July 1, 2014
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Having trouble accessing your favorite database?

interrobangsmallHi there! So today was the big switch from Ovid to EBSCO for the following databases:

  • EBM Reviews (renamed Cochrane Collection)
  • Medline
  • PsycINFO (including PsycArticles)
  • SocINDEX (replaced Social Work Abstracts)

 

As we work to update our links to these databases on the Library website, here’s a (relatively) easy way to access these databases.

 

  1. From JKM’s homepage, click Databases A-Z underneath the search toolbar
  2. Click the link for “Academic Search Premier” (It’s the first one-can’t miss it!)
  3. Above the EBSCOHost search bar, click the “Choose Databases” link (Pictured)asp
  4. Un-select Academic Search Premier and choose the database(s) that you’d like to search
  5. Tah-dah!

 

Soon enough, you’ll be able to search through your chosen database(s).

Thank you for your patience, and best of luck with your research!

January 25, 2013
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The Hardest Part of Research

Getting Started

In the fall, we asked you to tell us what the hardest part of research is for you.  For many of you, it’s getting started (“knowing where to begin,” “starting it,” “the beginning”).  If part of the difficulty is that you know very little about your topic, check out CredoReference.  This great database contains encyclopedia, dictionary, and handbook articles on many topics.  These should give you an overview of your topic and some ideas on how to break it down.  You can find CredoReference in the Databases A-Z list on the library’s homepage.

 

Avoiding Distractions

Individual Study Room

Individual Study Room

If you are easily distracted (for example, this person: “Continuing to stay interested when there are shiny objects and funny noises in the same room as you because suddenly tinkling glasses and butterflies and candy and”), consider one of the library’s individual study rooms.  These locked rooms have desk space and outlets.  They are a great place to hide away from many of life’s distractions and get some work done.

Locating Information

Many of you also mentioned struggling with locating information.  This is definitely an area that librarians can help!  If you have a hard time with “looking for articles” or “navigating research terms to find the best results,” you should check out our Basic Databases Workshops:

  • January 29 (Tuesday): 11:30am to 12:20
  • February 4 (Monday): 5:30pm to 6:20

Workshop Description: Need to find articles for a paper? Can’t remember how to use the library databases? This workshop offers an introduction to online database searching strategies to help you find the resources you need.

Evaluating your Sources

For those of you struggling with “Being critical about your sources/citations” and “Sorting the wheat from the chaff,” consider attending our Evaluating Resources Workshops:

  • February 12 (Tuesday): 11:30am to 12:20
  • February 25 (Monday): 2:00pm to 2:50

Workshop Description: Not sure if you are selecting the best resources for your assignment?  Attend this workshop to learn more about how to evaluate the resources you find – books, journals, websites, and everything else.

Organizing your Sources

At least one of you mentioned that “keeping everything organized” was a frustration.  There are many ways to organize your research.  If you are interested in some tech tools that can help you, you may want to learn more about Mendeley or Zotero at our workshops:

  • Zotero
    • February 5 (Tuesday): 11:30am to 12:20
    • February 6 (Wednesday): 5:15pm to 6:05
  • Mendeley
    • February 14 (Thursday): 11:30am to 12:20
    • February 19 (Tuesday): 5:15pm to 6:05

Workshop Description: Working on research and have PDFs saved all over the place?  Do you keep misplacing the articles you’ve found?  There’s an easier way to keep track!  Attend these workshops to learn more about Mendeley and/or Zotero, tools that you can use both to keep all your research in one location and to create citations.

Unable to attend a library workshop or want individual assistance? Ask a librarian!

Procrastination

PaceCenter5Avoiding procrastination is another tricky area (“turning on self-control,” “calculating how long you can procrastinate until the situation becomes desperate,” “ignoring the cat”).  The PACE Center offers some workshops on procrastination and time management that you may find useful:

  • Friday, January 25: Time Management in College, 11:30am, Chatham Eastside: Main Conference Room
  • Wednesday, January 30: Time Management in College, 11:30am, Davis Room: JKM Library
  • Friday, February 22: Procrastination, 11:30am, Davis Room: JKM Library
  • Monday, February 25: Procrastination, 11:30am, Chatham Eastside: Main Conference Room

 Writing the Paper

The PACE Center also provides writing help for those of you who struggle with “writing up the paper” and “editing.”

 

October 27, 2011
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Quick Guide: Getting Journal Articles through Interlibrary Loan

Some rights reserved by EAPhotography

It’s that time of year again…leaves are falling from the trees, the air is getting chilly, and you need to find full-text articles for an end-of-semester assignment.

Not to worry! Getting journal articles through interlibrary loan is a pretty painless process, once you get used to it.

First, make sure to check if the library has access to the article you are looking for in our print collection or through our online journal subscriptions. To do this, go to the library website and check the List of Print and Online Journals to see if we have access to the journal (or magazine or newspaper) that published the article in question. If we do have access to the journal that published the article you are looking for, make sure that we have access for the year the article was published – for instance, we sometimes don’t have access to articles published in the most recent 12 months.

If we don’t have access to the article, the next step is easy: simply fill out an Interlibrary Loan Request for a Journal Article. Be sure to fill the form out as completely as possible, which will insure that the request will process quickly.

As always, check in with any of the Jennie King Mellon librarians if you have any questions about this process!

 

Contributed by: Lora M. Dziemiela, Reference Associate

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