June 10, 2020
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The JKM Library’s Antiracist eBook Reading List

Antiracist eBook List header imageMany organizations and institutions have been offering incredible antiracist reading lists, packed with critically acclaimed fiction and nonfiction that add to our individual education on systemic and institutional racism in the United States and around the world. You should consult these lists and make your own TBR (to be read) pile of antiracist titles. It is a personal, moral, and civic duty that we commit to learning about the history, hardships, and experiences of our fellow Americans. It is also our duty to confront white supremacy on personal, local, and systemic levels. These reading lists can be an excellent start to that work. Armed with new knowledge and understanding, we can be better equipped to help push for lasting change in this country and around the world. Knowledge truly is power.

Below is a list of eBook titles that can be accessed freely by Chatham University students, faculty, and staff. Some are antiracist staples, some are more specifically focused on education, and some can help you take the next step in turning your knowledge into productive action for the collective good. Images are from Goodreads. Descriptions are from the publishers and/or Goodreads. Follow the linked titles to check out the eBook today.

The Souls of Black Folk book coverThe Souls of Black Folk by W.E.B. Du Bois

“This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that ‘the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line,’ and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the Black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and ‘Negro music,’ and remain essential reading. A new introduction by Jonathan Holloway explores Du Bois’s signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.”

The New Jim Crow book coverThe New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander

“Once in a great while a book comes along that changes the way we see the world and helps to fuel a nationwide social movement. The New Jim Crow is such a book. Praised by Harvard Law professor Lani Guinier as ‘brave and bold,’ this book directly challenges the notion that the election of Barack Obama signals a new era of colorblindness. With dazzling candor, legal scholar Michelle Alexander argues that ‘we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it.’ By targeting Black men through the War on Drugs and decimating communities of color, the U.S. criminal justice system functions as a contemporary system of racial control—relegating millions to a permanent second-class status—even as it formally adheres to the principle of colorblindness. In the words of Benjamin Todd Jealous, president and CEO of the NAACP, this book is a ‘call to action.’ Called ‘stunning’ by Pulitzer Prize-winning historian David Levering Lewis, ‘invaluable’ by the Daily Kos, ‘explosive’ by Kirkus, and ‘profoundly necessary’ by the Miami Herald, this updated and revised paperback edition of The New Jim Crow, now with a foreword by Cornel West, is a must-read for all people of conscience.”

Black Feminist Thought book coverBlack Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment by Patricia Hill Collins

“In spite of the double burden of racial and gender discrimination, African-American women have developed a rich intellectual tradition that is not widely known. In Black Feminist Thought, Patricia Hill Collins explores the words and ideas of Black feminist intellectuals as well as those African-American women outside academe. She provides an interpretive framework for the work of such prominent Black feminist thinkers as Angela Davis, bell hooks, Alice Walker, and Audre Lorde. The result is a superbly crafted book that provides the first synthetic overview of Black feminist thought.”

On Lynchings book coverOn Lynchings by Ida B. Wells-Barnett

Though the end of the Civil War brought legal emancipation to Blacks, it is a fact of history that their social oppression continued long after. The most virulent form of this ongoing persecution was the practice of lynching carried out by mob rule, often as local law enforcement officials looked the other way. During the 1880s and 1890s, more than 100 African Americans per year were lynched, and in 1892 alone the toll of murdered men and women reached a peak of 161.

In that awful year, the 23-year-old Ida B. Wells, the editor of a small newspaper for Blacks in Memphis, Tennessee, raised one lone voice of protest. In her paper, she charged that white businessmen had instigated three local lynchings against their black competitors. In retaliation for her outspoken courage, a goon-squad of angry whites destroyed her editorial office and print shop, and she was forced to flee the South and move to New York City. So began a crusade against lynching which became the focus of her long, active, and very courageous life. In New York, she began lecturing against the abhorrent vigilante practice and published her first pamphlet on the subject called ‘Southern Horrors.’ After moving to Chicago and marrying lawyer Ferdinand Barnett, she continued her campaign, publishing ‘A Red Record’ in 1895 and ‘Mob Rule in New Orleans,’ about the race riots in that city, in 1900. All three of these documents are collected in On Lynchings, a shocking testament to cruelty and the dark American legacy of racial prejudice.”

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass book coverNarrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave: Written by Himself, Critical Edition

“A new edition of one of the most influential literary documents in American and African American history. Ideal for coursework in American and African American history, this revised edition of Frederick Douglass’s memoir of his life as a slave in pre-Civil War Maryland incorporates a wide range of supplemental materials to enhance students’ understanding of slavery, abolitionism, and the role of race in American society. Offering readers a new appreciation of Douglass’s world, it includes documents relating to the slave narrative genre and to the later career of an essential figure in the nineteenth-century abolition movement.”

Race for Profit book coverRace for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

“By the late 1960s and early 1970s, reeling from a wave of urban uprisings, politicians finally worked to end the practice of redlining. Reasoning that the turbulence could be calmed by turning Black city-dwellers into homeowners, they passed the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968, and set about establishing policies to induce mortgage lenders and the real estate industry to treat Black homebuyers equally. The disaster that ensued revealed that racist exclusion had not been eradicated, but rather transmuted into a new phenomenon of predatory inclusion. Race for Profit uncovers how exploitative real estate practices continued well after housing discrimination was banned. The same racist structures and individuals remained intact after redlining’s end, and close relationships between regulators and the industry created incentives to ignore improprieties. Meanwhile, new policies meant to encourage low-income homeownership created new methods to exploit Black homeowners. The federal government guaranteed urban mortgages in an attempt to overcome resistance to lending to Black buyers – as if unprofitability, rather than racism, was the cause of housing segregation. Bankers, investors, and real estate agents took advantage of the perverse incentives, targeting the Black women most likely to fail to keep up their home payments and slip into foreclosure, multiplying their profits. As a result, by the end of the 1970s, the nation’s first programs to encourage Black homeownership ended with tens of thousands of foreclosures in Black communities across the country. The push to uplift Black homeownership had descended into a goldmine for realtors and mortgage lenders, and a ready-made cudgel for the champions of deregulation to wield against government intervention of any kind. Narrating the story of a sea-change in housing policy and its dire impact on African Americans, Race for Profit reveals how the urban core was transformed into a new frontier of cynical extraction.”

Black and Blue book coverBlack and Blue: The Origins and Consequences of Medical Racism by John Hoberman

Black and Blue is the first systematic description of how American doctors think about racial differences and how this kind of thinking affects the treatment of their black patients. The standard studies of medical racism examine past medical abuses of Black people and do not address the racially motivated thinking and behaviors of physicians practicing medicine today. Black and Blue penetrates the physician’s private sphere where racial fantasies and misinformation distort diagnoses and treatments. Doctors have always absorbed the racial stereotypes and folkloric beliefs about racial differences that permeate the general population. Within the world of medicine this racial folklore has infiltrated all of the medical sub-disciplines, from cardiology to gynecology to psychiatry. Doctors have thus imposed White or Black racial identities upon every organ system of the human body, along with racial interpretations of Black children, the Black elderly, the Black athlete, Black musicality, Black pain thresholds, and other aspects of Black minds and bodies. The American medical establishment does not readily absorb either historical or current information about medical racism. For this reason, racial enlightenment will not reach medical schools until the current race-aversive curricula include new historical and sociological perspectives.”

We Have Not Been Moved book coverWe Have Not Been Moved: Resisting Racism and Militarism in 21st Century America by Elizabeth Betita Martinez (Editor) Matt Meyer (Editor), Mandy Carter (Editor), Alice Walker (Afterword), Sonia Sanchez (Afterword), Cornel West (Foreword)

“A compendium of writings that detail the grassroots actions of social and political activists from the civil rights era of the early 1960s to the present day, this book reviews the major points of intersection between white supremacy and the war machine through historic and contemporary articles from a diverse range of scholars and activists. Among the historic texts included are rarely seen writings by antiracist icons such as Anne Braden, Barbara Deming, and Audre Lorde as well as a dialogue between Dr. King, revolutionary nationalist Robert F. Williams, Dave Dellinger, and Dorothy Day. Never-before-published pieces appear from civil rights and gay rights organizer Bayard Rustin and from celebrated U.S. pacifist supporter of Puerto Rican sovereignty Ruth Reynolds. Additional articles, essays, interviews, and poems from numerous contributors examine the strategic and tactical possibilities of radical transformation for lasting social change through revolutionary nonviolence.”

Antiracist School LeadershipAntiracist School Leadership: Toward Equity in Education for America’s Students by Jeffrey S. Brooks

“Since the passing of Brown versus Board of Education to the election of the first Black president of the United States, there has been much discussion on how far we have come as a nation on issues of race. Some continue to assert that Barack Obama’s election ushered in a new era—making the US a post-racial society. But this argument is either a political contrivance, borne of ignorance or a bold-faced lie. There is no recent data on school inequities, or inequity in society for that matter, that suggests we have arrived at Dr. King’s dream that his ‘four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.’ Children today are instead still judged by the color of their skin, and this inequitable practice is manifest in today’s schools for students of color in the form of disproportionate student discipline referrals, achievement and opportunity gaps, pushout rates, overrepresentation in special education and underrepresentation in advanced coursework, among other indicators (Brooks, 2012). Though issues of race in the public education system may take an overt or covert form; racial injustice in public schools is still pervasive, complex, and cumulative. The authors in this book explore various ways that racism is manifest in the American school system. Through a plurality of perspectives, they deconstruct, challenge, and reconstruct an educational leadership committed to equity and excellence for marginalized students and educators.”

Towards Collective Liberation book coverTowards Collective Liberation: Anti-Racist Organizing, Feminist Praxis, and Movement Building Strategy by Chris Crass

“Organized into four sections, this collection of essays is geared toward activists engaging with the dynamic questions of how to create and support effective movements for visionary systemic change. These essays and interviews present powerful lessons for transformative organizing. It offers a firsthand look at the challenges and the opportunities of antiracist work in white communities, feminist work with men, and bringing women of color feminism into the heart of social movements. Drawing on two decades of personal activist experience and case studies within these areas, Crass’s essays insightfully explore ways of transforming divisions of race, class, and gender into catalysts for powerful vision, strategy, and building movements in the United States today. This collection will inspire and empower anyone who is interested in implementing change through organizing.”

The Next American Revolution book coverThe Next American Revolution: Sustainable Activism for the Twenty-First Century by Grace Lee Boggs

“The pioneering Asian American labor organizer and writer’s vision for intersectional and anti-racist activism. In this powerful, deeply humanistic book, Grace Lee Boggs, a legendary figure in the struggle for justice in America, shrewdly assesses the current crisis—political, economical, and environmental—and shows how to create the radical social change we need to confront new realities. A vibrant, inspirational force, Boggs has participated in all of the twentieth century’s major social movements—for civil rights, women’s rights, workers’rights, and more. She draws from seven decades of activist experience, and a rigorous commitment to critical thinking, to redefine “revolution” for our times. From her home in Detroit, she reveals how hope and creativity are overcoming despair and decay within the most devastated urban communities. Her book is a manifesto for creating alternative modes of work, politics, and human interaction that will collectively constitute the next American Revolution—which is unraveling before our eyes.”

We hope you find this eBook reading list helpful as you begin or continue your antiracist work. You can follow the JKM Library’s Instagram account (@jkmlibrary) for more book recommendations on various topics. And you can recommend a specific book to be added to the JKM Library’s collection by emailing Reference@Chatham.edu or reaching out to a specific librarian.

March 17, 2020
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Our Virtual Services FAQs

We at the JKM Library hope you’re all staying healthy and taking all necessary precautions to keep others healthy too. We know this is a stressful time, but the JKM Library’s librarians are here for you and your research needs! That being said, we are limited in how we can help. See the FAQ below, and if you still have questions, please reach out to us through the Ask a Librarian chat on our homepage or via email at reference@chatham.edu.

  • Can I get into the library building?
    • The library building is closed for the time being.
    • The 24/7 space is now also closed to the public. If you have an [urgent, immediate, pressing] need to access the 24/7 space, please complete the Computer Lab Access Request Form on myChatham -> Documents and Forms -> Residence Life -> JKM Library Computer Lab Access Request Form.
  • Can I access the University Archives?
    • Not physically, but the archives’ digital collections can be accessed on their website (https://library.chatham.edu/archives)!
    • You may also email your archives related questions to Archivist Molly Tighe at m.tighe@chatham.edu
  • Can I use E-ZBorrow and/or ILLiad?
    • E-ZBorrow is no longer available at this time. ILLiad is available but limited. Our team is working on setting up remote functionality, and right now we’re working off of an automated system. To increase your chances of receiving your item, be sure to include the ISSN in your request form. Only digital items will be processed at this time, nothing physical.
  • Can I return my library items?
    • If you are graduating and are done with your items, please return them to the library via the drop box in the library vestibule if you are able. If you are graduating but have already left campus or if you will be returning to campus, you can return them by snail mail or in person once we reopen. If you have a question or concern, please reach out to Head of Access Services Kate Wenger (kwenger@chatham.edu).
  • Will I get fined due to Coronavirus related late items?
    • No. If you have any concerns about library items being overdue, please reach out to Head of Access Services Kate Wenger (kwenger@chatham.edu)
  • Can I schedule a research appointment?
    • Yes! Librarians are available to work with you one-on-one via Zoom. Please email your subject librarian or fill out this form to make an appointment.
  • Can I still do research?
    • Definitely! You have access to about 70 digital databases, almost over 750,000 full text eBooks, and over 85,000 full text eJournals.
    • You can search almost all of our digital content via the “All Resources” tab on our homepage.
    • You can search for our individual full text eJournals and ebooks via the “Search for eJournal Titles” button on the homepage.
    • You can search for individual databases alphabetically via our “Find Databases” button on our homepage.
    • See our Research Guides in your subject area or for things like primary sources and citation information via the “See Resources by Subject” button on our homepage.
  • Can I access physical books, journals, movies, or other items in the library?
    • No, unfortunately no physical items in the library building are available at this time.
  • Can I call the library and talk with a librarian?
    • Not right now, but you can email us or Zoom with us, or use our chat
  • Can I chat quickly with a librarian?
    • Absolutely! We will be monitoring our Ask a Librarian chat on our homepage during these hours:
      • 8:00 am – 10:00 pm Monday – Thursday
      • 8:00 am – 5:00 pm Friday
      • 1:00 pm – 7:00 pm Saturday
      • 12:00 pm – 10:00 pm Sunday

We hope this FAQ is helpful and that we can continue to assist you in all your academic endeavors! Please stay up-to-date on library offerings and announcements by checking our social media pages (@jkmlibrary and @chathamarchives on Instagram, library Facebook, archives Facebook) and our website regularly.

February 20, 2020
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Personal Digital Privacy Tools

As we live more and more of our lives on the Internet, it’s important to take personal digital privacy seriously. Hacking techniques can be very sophisticated, and a breech in your privacy can have devastating effects. Learning how to protect your data and your privacy online, as well as how to develop good digital hygiene, is becoming more and more important.

Last semester (fall 2019), we conducted an informal #BeCyberSmart survey of our patrons, asking which level of familiarity they have with personal digital privacy and which actions they take to protect their personal information online.

Patrons were asked to select a sticker color that corresponded with their knowledge level and place those stickers in the columns representing actions they have taken to protect their personal digital privacy. Below are the results of this interactive informal survey.

While most participants have indicated that they know at least a little bit about personal digital privacy and cybersecurity, there is always room for more knowledge! The more you know, the better able you are to protect yourself online. Below we’ve compiled a quick list of resources for you to use when going about a personal digital detox or increasing your personal digital privacy.

1) Use a password manager like Bitwarden or LastPass.

2) Go through the Data Detox Kit: https://datadetoxkit.org/en/home

  • From the website… “The Data Detox Kit’s clear suggestions and concrete steps help people harness all aspects of their online lives, making more informed choices and changing their digital habits in ways that suit them.”
  • Follow simple step-by-step guides to cleaning up your digital presence and locking down your digital privacy
  • Includes tips and tricks for how to maintain your privacy and good digital hygiene
  • Offers alternatives to popular apps that do not respect your privacy or pose threats to your privacy
  • Developed by Berlin-based organization called Tactical Tech in partnership with Mozilla

3) Swap out Google for DuckDuckGo: https://duckduckgo.com/

  • DuckDuckGo is a privacy-focused search engine that runs off of the same search index as Bing, which means it isn’t quite as intuitive as Google, but your information stays safe!
  • It does NOT track your searches
  • It has a very useful browser plug-in that will “grade” each website you visit in terms of how well that website will protect your personal digital information: https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/duckduckgo-for-firefox/
  • It blocks ads for you. We still recommend adding additional ad blockers (The Data Detox Kit has great suggestions)
  • When coupling DuckDuckGo with Firefox, you’re off to a good start in terms of protecting your privacy while using the Internet

4) Feeling really adventurous? Try out Brave Browser: https://brave.com/

  • From the website… “You deserve a better Internet. So we reimagined what a browser should be. It begins with giving you back power. Get unmatched speed, security and privacy by blocking trackers. Earn rewards by opting into our privacy-respecting ads and help give publishers back their fair share of Internet revenue.”
  • Brave goes beyond protecting your privacy. It revolutionizes how companies monetize their online presence and put that power in your hands. Instead of suffering through ads, you get to decide where your money goes. And if you decide you’re ok with ads, you get rewarded for it!
  • Brave does not collect your data and gives you incredible control over your own Internet experience

5) Visit the Electronic Frontier Foundation and read up on current affairs concerning personal digital privacy online and more: https://www.eff.org/issues/net-neutrality

  • From the website… “The Electronic Frontier Foundation is the leading nonprofit organization defending civil liberties in the digital world. Founded in 1990, EFF champions user privacy, free expression, and innovation through impact litigation, policy analysis, grassroots activism, and technology development. We work to ensure that rights and freedoms are enhanced and protected as our use of technology grows.”
  • They advocate for safe, secure, and equitable access to Internet resources for all
  • Take advantage of their numerous tools and additional resources to protect Internet users’ privacy: https://www.eff.org/pages/tools
  • Volunteer with the EFF and contribute even more!

September 26, 2018
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Interlibrary Loan: What It is and How to Use It

Here at the JKM Library, our librarians do their best to ensure that the collections and resources we provide fit your needs as students, faculty, and researchers. Our library’s stacks are home to over 144,000 physical books, magazines, print journals, DVDs/Blu-rays, CDs, and more. And through the library’s website, you also have access to electronic resources such as e-books, journals, magazines, and newspapers. Amazing, right?!

While this is a huge number of resources at your disposal, it’s likely that at one point or another throughout your Chatham career you will want to get ahold of something that is particularly unusual, hard-to-find, or simply beyond the scope of our collections as an academic library. Whether it’s because your thesis is on a fairly niche topic and you need to find sources for it, you’re looking for your textbooks for the new semester, or you were just hoping to read the latest YA release that hasn’t made its way to our Curriculum Collection shelves yet – whatever the reason, interlibrary loan can help you access the books, media, and articles that we just don’t have in our collections.

What is Interlibrary Loan?

It would be impractical, not to say virtually impossible, for a library to retain a copy of every single book ever published, so many libraries purchase books they anticipate that their patrons will use and then rely on interlibrary loan (ILL) to help bridge the gaps in their collections. ILL is a resource sharing service used by libraries all over the world that allows their users to borrow books, DVDs, music, articles, theses, and more from other libraries that they have formed cooperative agreements with. The best part is, at Chatham, this service is available to you completely free of charge! The library covers all normal shipping costs for interlibrary loan items.

We currently use two different systems to manage your interlibrary loan requests here: E-ZBorrow and ILLiad. Both are useful for finding different types of materials, though there are a few key differences between them and what you would want to use each system for, which we will explain here.

Continue Reading →

August 31, 2016
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The 24/7 Lab – An Always-Open Study Space

If you need a place to study late at night after the Library closes, or if you need to print out your paper after finishing it at 2:00 AM, check out our 24/7 Lab!

24/7 Lab

24/7 Lab

The 24/7 Lab is a computer lab which is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.  It can be accessed via a door in the glass vestibule which can be opened using your student ID!

Entrance to the 24/7 Lab

Entrance to the 24/7 Lab

 

After the library closes at midnight (or at 7 PM on Fridays and Saturdays), the 24/7 Lab is extended from the one computer lab room to include Room 103, LCC1, and the large Library lab. This provides a variety of open tables and computer access as well as group study and individual spaces.

Room 103

Room 103

 

LCC1

LCC1

 

Library Lab 101

Library Lab 101

 

The nearest bathrooms to the 24/7 Lab are located in the Eddy Theater Lobby.  For your comfort and convenience, the Eddy Theater Lobby will be open. The Eddy doors nearest the Library will remain unlocked as well as the wheelchair accessible entrance on the other side of the building.

Eddy Theater Lobby Entrance

Eddy Theater Lobby Entrance

We hope that the 24/7 Lab proves to be useful to you!  Happy studying and be brilliant!

August 12, 2016
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2016 Summer Reading List

The books of the 2016 Summer Reading List are now on display on the first floor of the Library!!

What is the Summer Reading List? Your friendly Chatham University Librarians have been keeping an eye out for interesting, informative, and exciting books over the past year and thought you might enjoy reading some of these as you start your first year at Chatham. Featuring popular nonfiction, as well as some great literature, this list contains something for everyone!  Find the full 2016 Summer Reading List here!

Some highlights of the List include:

Tattoos: philosophy for everyone: I ink, therefore I am / edited by Robert ArpTattoos: Philosophy for Everyone: I Ink, Therefore I Am by Robert Arp

Body art or eyesore, a celebration of individuality, or at very least a conversation piece, tattoos provide fertile ground for philosophical discussion, raising intriguing questions from aesthetics to feminism, from semiotics to the philosophy of the person.

The evolution of a corporate idealist: when girl meets oil / Christine BaderThe Evolution of a Corporate Idealist: When Girl Meets Oil by Christine Bader

The Evolution of a Corporate Idealist: Girl Meets Oil is based on Bader’s experience with BP and then with a United Nations effort to prevent and address human rights abuses linked to business. Using her story as its skeleton, Bader weaves in the stories of other “Corporate Idealists” working inside some of the world’s biggest and best-known companies.

How to do things with videogames / Ian BogostHow to Do Things with Videogames by Ian Bogost

Until games are understood to have valid applications across the cultural spectrum, their true potential will remain unrealized. How to Do Things with Videogames offers a fresh starting point to more fully consider games’ progress today and promise for the future.

It's easy being green: a handbook for earth-friendly living / Crissy TraskIt’s Easy Being Green: A Handbook for Earth-Friendly Living by Crissy Trask

It’s Easy Being Green is a handy tool to help you make better choices for the environment. This is what the busy person needs to start making changes today. Get informative, comprehensive and practical information for adopting greener buying habits and identifying earth-friendly products; shopping for green products online; participating in online activism; and learning from over 250 eco-tips for cultivating a sustainable environment.

Half a lifelong romance / Eileen Chang ; translated by Karen S. KingsburyHalf a Lifelong Romance by Eileen Chang; translated by Karen S. Kingsbury

Shanghai, 1930s. Shen Shijun, a young engineer, has fallen in love with his colleague, the beautiful Gu Manzhen. He is determined to resist his family’s efforts to match him with his wealthy cousin so that he can marry her. But dark circumstances—a lustful brother-in-law, a treacherous sister, a family secret—force the two young lovers apart…A glamorous, wrenching tale set against the glittering backdrop of an extraordinary city, Half a Lifelong Romance is a beloved classic from one of the essential writers of twentieth-century China.

On writing: a memoir of the craft / by Stephen KingOn Writing: A Memoir of the Craft by Stephen King

Stephen King reflects on how his writing has helped him through difficult times and describes various aspects of the art of writing.

Book of rhymes: the poetics of hip hop / Adam BradleyBook of Rhymes: The Poetics of Hip Hop by Adam Bradley

Examining rap history’s most memorable lyricists and their inimitable techniques, literary scholar Adam Bradley argues that we must understand rap as poetry or miss the vanguard of poetry today. Book of Rhymes explores America’s least understood poets, unpacking their surprisingly complex craft, and according rap poetry the respect it deserves.

A short history of nearly everything / Bill BrysonA Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson

In this book Bill Bryson explores the most intriguing and consequential questions that science seeks to answer and attempts to understand everything that has transpired from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization. To that end, Bill Bryson apprenticed himself to a host of the world’s most profound scientific minds, living and dead.

Crazy: a father's search through America's mental health madness / Pete EarleyCrazy: A Father’s Search through America’s Mental Health Madness by Pete Earley

Former Washington Post reporter Pete Earley had written extensively about the criminal justice system. But it was only when his own son-in the throes of a manic episode-broke into a neighbor’s house that he learned what happens to mentally ill people who break a law. This is the Earley family’s compelling story, a troubling look at bureaucratic apathy and the countless thousands who suffer confinement instead of care, brutal conditions instead of treatment, in the ‘revolving doors’ between hospital and jail.

The quartet: orchestrating the second American Revolution, 1783-1789 / Joseph J. EllisThe Quartet: Orchestrating the Second American Revolution, 1783-1789 by Joseph J. Ellis

From Pulitzer Prize–winning American historian Joseph J. Ellis, the unexpected story of why the thirteen colonies, having just fought off the imposition of a distant centralized governing power, would decide to subordinate themselves anew. In 1776, thirteen American colonies declared themselves independent states that only temporarily joined forces in order to defeat the British. Once victorious, they planned to go their separate ways. The Quartet is the story of the second American founding and of the men most responsible—George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison.

June 22, 2013
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ILLiad is here

The Jennie King Mellon Library is very pleased to let you all know that we now have an automated system to process interlibrary loans called ILLiad. This program is used by hundreds of university libraries across the country and now Chatham users we be able to share its benefits.
ILLiad provides a more efficient process for receiving the books and journal articles you request. Users will also have more options including choosing which e-mail they want to be notified by when materials come in and can view the status of each request. Please visit library.chatham.edu to immediately open your account.
Lastly, just a reminder that close to half of all inter-library loan requests are for materials that Chatham already has! Please always check the JKM Library’s JournalFinder feature at http://journalfinder.wtcox.com/chatham/ to double check for articles before sending a request and never hesitate to speak with one of the reference librarians first. It’s our job!
Illiad 3

October 27, 2011
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Quick Guide: Getting Journal Articles through Interlibrary Loan

Some rights reserved by EAPhotography

It’s that time of year again…leaves are falling from the trees, the air is getting chilly, and you need to find full-text articles for an end-of-semester assignment.

Not to worry! Getting journal articles through interlibrary loan is a pretty painless process, once you get used to it.

First, make sure to check if the library has access to the article you are looking for in our print collection or through our online journal subscriptions. To do this, go to the library website and check the List of Print and Online Journals to see if we have access to the journal (or magazine or newspaper) that published the article in question. If we do have access to the journal that published the article you are looking for, make sure that we have access for the year the article was published – for instance, we sometimes don’t have access to articles published in the most recent 12 months.

If we don’t have access to the article, the next step is easy: simply fill out an Interlibrary Loan Request for a Journal Article. Be sure to fill the form out as completely as possible, which will insure that the request will process quickly.

As always, check in with any of the Jennie King Mellon librarians if you have any questions about this process!

 

Contributed by: Lora M. Dziemiela, Reference Associate

January 28, 2011
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Library Newsletter

The Spring 2011 edition of Library News is now available.  Read about all the great materials and services being offered by the JKM Library, including:

  • A new, easier way to track down full text articles;
  • Three great new databases: Global Road Warrior, Counseling & Therapy in Video, and American History in Video;
  • News from the Chatham University Archives;
  • And much more!

January 24, 2011
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Jennie King Mellon

Jennie King Mellon

So who exactly is JKM?

Jennie King Mellon attended the Pennsylvania Female College, now Chatham University, in the late 19th century. She married Richard Beatty Mellon, the brother of the established Andrew W. Mellon, and raised two children, Richard King Mellon and Sarah Scaife Mellon.

Jennie King Mellon and her family resided in a 65 room mansion on Fifth Avenue in Shadyside in the area which has since become Mellon Park. Her spirit and love for nature are still seen today seen in the two large gardens facing Beechwood Boulevard.

The Mellon family is also well-known for their philanthropical efforts through charitable foundations, including the Sarah Scaife Foundation and Richard King Mellon Foundation, which primarily support culture and community development in the Pittsburgh region.

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