Category Archives: Student experience

International Education Week: November 12-16th, 2018

International Education week is an opportunity to celebrate the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide. This joint initiative of the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Department of Education promotes programs that prepare Americans for a global environment and attract future leaders from abroad to study, learn and exchange experiences.

Students, international and domestic, are encouraged to participate in the events scheduled during this week. At the events, international and domestic students can communicate with one another and learn facets of one another’s’ culture and make new friends.

On Monday November 12th, the Office of International Affairs partnered with the Chatham University Modern Language Department for “International Karaoke.” Offered each semester, this popular events brings together students to sing in Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Spanish, as well as other languages.

Students in the Modern Language classes are able to practice by singing in their target languages. With well over 100 in attendance, International Education Week started on a high note.

On November 13th, students were invited to the international conversation hour, in the Mellon solarium. The international conversation hour provides topics for students to discuss in order to develop understanding of each other’s cultures.

Later that evening, the Chatham University Vira Heinz Scholars presented on “American Abroad: Social Identity and Positionality in a Global and Domestic Environment.” Students, Miranda Boyden (studied in Italy), Janelle Moore (Costa Rica), Erion Morton (Japan) and Kaylee Spitak (Japan) studied in the summer of 2018 with support from the Vira I Heinz Program for Women in Global Leadership. The VIH program “prepares women for tomorrow’s global challenges by offering a unique opportunity for international experiences, leadership development and community service.” Students receive $5000+ scholarship for an international educational experience.

The Chatham 2018 CEE, American Abroad: Social Identity and Positionality in a Global and Domestic Environment involved roundtable discussions around social identity and its impact on students’ experiences at home and abroad.

Thursday November 14th was a cold and rainy day for trivia! OIA hosted the International Jeopardy contest in the Carriage House, and tested students’ knowledge of world history, geography, and global facts.

With quite of few interested in playing, students played in teams of three to pool their knowledge.  With challenging questions, such as “Which country lists internet access as a human right?”, students played through five categories. Though last coming into final Jeopardy, Team Brazil, won with a high bet, and the correct answer. Students Dylan Jacquard, Vinni Muniz, and Mana Soda claimed the title of International Jeopardy Champs!

The final event for International Education week was a welcome respite from biting cold. On the day of the first snow of Fall 2018, the staff of the Office of International Affairs met students both local and international to celebrate diversity with a hot cup of tea. The International tea party included flavors from the strong and bitter Irish breakfast to the mellow sweetness of tropical mango and chocolate. This helped warming the attendees and made the conversation flow, everything from food, to internships, to study abroad, to difference between the United States and other countries was discussed.

Many students coming and going from class also stopped by to join conversation and enjoy a hot beverage.

Over the course of IEW, Chatham students across campus were able to engage in international and intercultural learning.

Chatham’s Dynamic US Culture & Cinema Course

A large screen glows in the pitch-dark classroom. It is eerily quiet.

Someone yells, “Don’t go in there!”

Others frantically chime in.

I peek around the screen on my podium to see 23 transfixed students, wide-eyed and hands covering mouths.

On the screen, the ceiling explodes. An alien tumbles onto the floor as scientists and soldiers scream as they scramble for safety.

Screams ricochet in our room, followed by nervous laughter.

This is US Culture and Cinema, a 100-level culture-based course that students take to learn about American culture, values, traditions and so much more through the lens of top ten classic American films.

Pre-reading activities include summaries, background information handouts and short video clips.

For each film, post-reading entails heavy discussions and a set of carefully crafted handouts designed to get students to reflect and synthesize information they’ve learned. Each handout builds upon their understanding and skills, starting with formulating their opinion, close critical reading, and summary honing. Film synopses are gapfill with word banks, giving students a chance to understand the story while they learn practical academic and technical vocab. Another handout doles out juicy film trivia followed by lively discussions in which they justify their favorite items. Same for quotes and film excerpts—with these they explain the humor, or infer why the character says something, and they act out parts of scenes as intoned in the film. There is a vocab match with words, phrases, and idioms and images. The Best Summaries has them choose the best summary out of 5 or 6 similar film genre summaries, specific character names removed.

While they actively watch the film, they follow along while completing questions with multiple choice answers. Questions are kept as simple as possible to prevent students from missing important moments. Images of the main characters are shown on this handout, along with images and maps of ideas or places at the end. The While You Watch questions and answers are designed to help students follow along with ease an otherwise potentially confusing film.

Each week, I send short video clips related to the film, director, film theory, and technical elements such as angles & shots and sound used in the film for them to watch and take notes for discussion. They then discuss the ideas they found most interesting and explain why. Class participation is typically very lively.

I have 3 criteria for choosing films. It should reflect American culture, values, traditions, and/or social issues. The film should also be a little older so that there is less chance of students having seen it. And finally, it should be in the top 10 or 20 for its genre.

This semester we watched Kramer vs Kramer (Drama), Singin’ in the Rain (Musical), Rear Window (Thriller), The Shining (Horror), The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (Western), Aliens (Sci-fi/Action), Big (Comedy).

by: Sylvia Shipp, English Language Program Lecturer & Student Advisor

 

A tragedy in Pittsburgh

On October 27, eleven people were killed as they worshiped at the Synagogue.

The Tree of Life Synagogue is just across the street from Chatham’s south entrance. The killings have forever changed Pittsburgh and the Squirrel Hill communities.  Grief and sadness still permeate.

“Stronger than Hate” signs are in front of people’s houses. Students stoically wear “Chatham is stronger than hate” t-shirts.  A sticker with the same message is on my office door.

Doing weekend shopping, I drove past the synagogue a couple of times.

Gone are the outdoor memorials. They have been moved indoors to create a permanent place of remembrance at the Tree of Life.

People are still gathering at the Synagogue. Some stand on the street corner, heads bowed in silent prayer. Others are taking pictures of the building. A stillness can still be felt in the area.

Deterring hatred. The work we do as international educators is important, I might even say vital.

Through international education and exchange, participating students learn a lot about their host country. They learn about their own countries as seen and understood by outsiders. They learn about themselves—their values, beliefs, strengths and weaknesses.  Students who participate in study abroad programs teach their hosts about their home countries.

Through international exchange, we come to learn about the range of human differences. We learn about race, ethnicity, gender identity, physical abilities, national origins, political beliefs, and religious and ethical values systems.

People-to-people diplomacy, learning about yourself and others, deters hatred.  Makes us stronger than hate.

Written by AVP Chris Musick, International Affairs

Three Accomplished Women on Scholarship at Chatham English Language Program

The English Language Program at Chatham University awarded three full-tuition scholarships to three local students in the summer 2018 semester. The students shared their stories and comments about the English Language Program in an interview with Shawn Kent, ELP Tutor, below.

Farazdaq Alhammood

Goal: Ph.D. in biotechnology and chemical engineering

When Farazdaq Alhammood started the ELP program at Chatham she had already lived in Pittsburgh for many years. Her goal is to pass her TOEFL exam, a requirement before getting her Ph.D. in biotechnology and genetic engineering. She has an MA in biotechnology from her home country of Iraq.

Farazdaq said that what she likes most about her English studies at English Language Program at Chatham University this summer is learning grammar, improving her vocabulary, and understanding tenses in speaking and writing. She feels she has made a lot of progress in the program. The teachers are good, and everyone is friendly and helpful. In fact, when asked about what suggestions she might have to improve the program she said, “Everything is perfect!”

The hardest thing is time. The summer program is short and intensive, and that creates some pressure. It goes fast. Still, her English—particularly her understanding of grammar, she says—has improved.

The first year in Pittsburgh was difficult. She had to find a job, study, and take care of her three kids. Two of them were born here. Her extended family was not around. In her own country she depended on her family. Now, she is stronger and feels more responsible for herself.

American culture was not hard to adjust to. She talks to her American neighbors. And she likes the holidays: Christmas, Thanksgiving, Halloween. She likes free summer movies in the park. “I’m so happy here,” she said.

Her favorite place is Point Park at sunset. She spends time with her family at the park. They enjoy the big fountain and being near the river.  When she is not with her family, she spends her time studying at Chatham.

The scholarship has been such a good opportunity for her to make progress in her goals. She hopes to finish her studies and become a doctor. “I like Chatham,” Farazdaq says. “They take care of us.”

Hong Zhao

Goal: Master’s Degree in Psychology and Counseling

 

“I know Chatham. It’s near our house. I love this place,” Hong said, when asked what she thought of Chatham.  The only thing she would change is to have more students from other countries and to mix them all up in class, rather than let students from a particular country stick together.

Hong was living in Pittsburgh and taking classes at Literacy Pittsburgh, where they told her about the scholarship program to study English for the summer at Chatham. She applied and was accepted.

The hardest thing about living in the U.S. for her was not knowing English. In her country, Hong could do a lot of things. Here, nothing. She felt stupid not knowing the language. But now she is better!  Her husband is American, so she learns a lot from him, though he also speaks Chinese. He studied Chinese philosophy and has visited China several times.

Hong said. “Freedom of expression is important here. But sometimes I build myself a cage. Sometimes, if a bird is in a cage too long it gets out and doesn’t know what to do. I should find a way to release myself, my mind.”

Hong studied to be a counselor in China. She wants to get a Master’s degree in psychology and counseling in the U.S. But first, she has to pass the TOEFL exam. That is her goal now.  She would like to keep studying at Chatham, but is not sure if she can afford it. The scholarship has been a wonderful opportunity for her to pursue her dream.

Ainagul Borambayeva

Goal: MBA at Chatham University

Hong Zhao told Ainagul about the scholarship at Chatham and it was Hong who encouraged her to apply. Ainagul is a caregiver for Hong’s family.

About Chatham, Ainagul says she has had a “very good experience here. A little hard. Don’t have time. One month is not enough.”

However, she says she will continue studying at home, now that she understands grammar.  Before, she only knew about the present and simple past. “Now I know 12 tenses! I like grammar—when the teacher explains everything!”

She speaks Russian at home with her husband, so she needs more time practicing English with other people. Her husband doesn’t speak English. He works at a pizza parlor where his co-workers also speak Russian. Luckily, Ainagul likes pizza. Her husband brings a pie home with him every night.

She also likes American culture. Nothing was hard to adjust to. She likes American people. “American people are very polite. In my country, if I don’t know people I don’t say hello. At first when people here said ‘Hello, how are you?’ I was confused. But it’s just like saying ‘hi.’ They smile. Now, my child, 4-years-old, when we take a walk he says ‘hello, how are you?’”

When asked what Chatham could improve, Ainagul answered, “More scholarships! More people from other countries, mix them all together to study.” But, she adds, “The program is very strong.”

One of Ainagul’s favorite places is the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, where she often takes her children. The family also likes going to the library where the kids can play and read.

What has changed for her is that her grammar has improved. “When I go to the bank, talk with the neighbor, I just ask, speak, talk! I feel more confident. I understand people!”

Next year she wants to pass the TOEFL and get an MBA at Chatham. She already has a degree in economics from Kazakhstan.  One day, Ainagul would like to work at BNY Mellon Bank and, in the future, be a manager.

Ohiopyle State Park

by Kylie Fletcher, OIA Student worker

On this past Sunday, I went with my family to Ohiopyle. Ohiopyle is a small riverside town that many people in (especially) Southern Pennsylvania visit during late Spring to late Fall. There’s a very long trail nearby, small shops that sell different frozen desserts and handmade products, a visitor center that doubles as a gift shop and museum, and rental places for whitewater rafting and biking. Often, people spend the day there and bring a picnic lunch to share with friends or family by the river. My family lives close by, about a 30-minute drive away, so we go rather often during the summer. Usually, my grandfather won’t let us go swimming in the water, no one is really sure why, but this year my siblings, cousin, and I waded in the river that runs through Ohiopyle.

Ohiopyle Falls 2018

My smallest cousins waded in the water near the riverbank, since they weren’t allowed to go farther. I watched my siblings and my other, older cousin, so we went out much farther into the water. It was freezing but refreshing in the recent heat. There are also a lot of dogs that swim and play catch in the water. Dogs who come to Ohiopyle are usually really friendly, several immediately made me pet them when I let the dogs sniff my hands. My family saw a husky who was afraid of the water and refused to go deeper than its ankles in the water and my siblings, cousin, and I saw another family with three puppies who looked like they were in the water for the first time. One of them was really excited to be in the water so the puppy was hopping in the shallow end of the river where we were. Going to Ohiopyle reminds me of the theory a lot of people have that most people’s dogs look like their owners. Most of the people I saw had dogs that looked and/ or acted really similar to their families, i.e. smaller, energetic dogs tended to be with active petite people, and greyhounds were with people that looked, like a greyhound, very very thin. I always think it’s funny to compare how a dog looks compared to their family.

When I was small, I used to get ice cream with my family after walking on the trails, but I found that I’m allergic to milk. This past trip to Ohiopyle, I saw that there was a frozen yogurt shop, which also had sorbet. Sorbet is basically a frozen fruit puree, which I always find more refreshing than ice cream when it’s hot anyway. There’s about six or seven different stores that sell ice cream, which is a lot considering they’re all in such a little town. There’s a few different stores that sell handmade jams and candy. I usually like looking around at the falls and river more than at the shops.

The waterfall area of Ohiopyle is a short walk away from the riverbank most people swim in. Obviously, visitors are not allowed to swim in the falls area of the river, though there is whitewater rafting renting services. I don’t think I’ve ever seen whitewater rafters at the falls, which I find different since I used to live near a waterfall where there would be a lot of people riding the falls in small boats. I think at Ohiopyle, though, the lack of people actually in the water makes it more beautiful since you can see the natural beauty of the water.

Kylie Fletcher is a senior at Chatham, majoring in Media Arts: Graphic Design and Cultural Studies. Kylie works in the Office of International Affairs.

 

 

Three Rivers Arts Festival

by Kylie Fletcher, OIA Student Worker

This summer I went to the Three Rivers Arts Festival in Downtown Pittsburgh. The festival took place June 1-10, which is the same time as Pride events. This year I did what I did last year, my first year living in Pittsburgh during the summer, and I went to both events. Pittsburgh Pride is an event that encourages LGBTQ+ individuals and people who support them to show their pride for the LGBTQ+ community. There’s always a march at the end of the week, with dancers, drummers, and regular people joining in.

Both the Arts Festival and Pittsburgh Pride are always crowded, especially during Sunday, the last day for both events. For the Three River Arts Festival, I go there once the crowds for the Pride events are too overwhelming for me. The two festivals are a street away from each other so going to both is no issue. I think the best part about the arts festival is the atmosphere. The Pride atmosphere is overwhelming after a few hours; it’s very loud and colorful. The arts festival is calm and relaxing. The Point is at the end of the Three Rivers Arts Festival as well, which isn’t often filled with people. Going to the Point after the long day of celebrating to take a rest is really pleasant. There’s enough people there to make the space feel inviting but not so much that it’s loud.

Art at the Three River Arts Festival is very mixed. There are a lot of different kinds of art made from different mediums. I think the most kind of art I saw were different household items and instruments made from wood around the entrance. Wooden cooking utensils and ceramic bowls and plates were rather abundant considering they made up about half of all the art. Vendors selling their paintings were mostly around all the food and the performers’ stage. I think the most interesting pieces I saw were paper cutting and record cutting.

At one small booth a man was selling different paper cuttings. He had some premade that he brought but if you wanted, he could commission a paper cutting. I heard from a friend when she went to the festival the day before me that he saw this woman who said it was her birthday and made her something for free. She had given birth recently and really quickly he made a paper cut out of a pregnant woman. When you moved the arms, a baby would come out of the figure. My friend said she didn’t notice any sort of glue or anything, so he made the entire piece with cutting and folding paper.

Another booth near the end of the festival had old records that had different figures or words cut out of them. The artist had heated a knife and used a hot knife to score where he wanted to cut into the record. While the material was still pliable, he used an x-acto knife to cut out pieces from the record. The process was probably rather tedious, since the material of the record probably cools pretty quickly. Most of what the artist was selling was preexisting popular logos and figures that would sell better than original artwork. There were portraits of famous people, mostly old rock stars, and logos of old rock bands cut from the records. I think his idea would be really cool for original artwork.

The way that a design would have to be made reminds me of art I made in a printmaking course I took. For wood block printing, the design you make has to be simple, since you can’t easily create tones between the color of the paper and the color of the ink. For the record cutting, you can’t create tones between the shapes because you have to create the design from negative space, the space cut from the record.

Umbrella project, Three Rivers Arts Festival 2017

The different public art pieces at the festival are interesting along with the art being sold. Last year there was a display of dozens of different colored umbrellas at the entrance of the festival. This year the umbrellas were taken down and the main walkway had signs the encouraged breastfeeding in public. The signs showed historical paintings with speech bubbles drawn by the people’s faces that said “Wow isn’t this a great place for breastfeeding?”.  I’m not sure if the water’s dyed or it’s painted on the inside, but there’s a really beautiful fountain with the bluest water I’ve ever seen.

Kylie Fletcher is a senior at Chatham, majoring in Media Arts: Graphic Design and Cultural Studies. Kylie works in the Office of International Affairs.

Overcoming Fears of Studying Abroad and Widening Outlooks of the World

By Karun Lelahuta, ELP Graduate, Chatham Graduate Student

Karun and friends – Academic Communication class

Karun wrote a speech to celebrate the his graduation from the English Language Program at Chatham University. He shares that studying abroad has helped him to widen his outlooks of the world, grow up and stand on his own, and love to make mistakes because that’s how he learns new things.

After studying at Chatham University for 9 months, I have gained much experience that guides me to become a person who I want to be.

Before I talk about the challenges I face during my study abroad experience, I want to tell you about my background. I was an unconfident person who tried to avoid groups of people. In daily life I used to be alone rather than hang around with my friends. My parents were concerned about me that I might have trouble when I grew up because I would have to work with many people. After I graduated from university in Thailand, they decided to send me to study abroad. My parents said to me, “You have to regain your English language skills” and they took me the United States. I can still remember how much I resisted to coming to the U.S. I thought to myself so many times day by day about why they wanted me to go to the U.S. just because of English. Finally, when they said to me that I could come back after 6 months, I agreed with them and came here to Pittsburgh.

Life in the United States was not as easy as I had thought. The first day I arrived in Chicago I had a horrible experience. I missed my flight to Pittsburgh, not because I was lost or I did not have enough time to transfer to another flight, but because of the TSA staff. She was very upset and shouted every minute, and she did her work very slowly, so I was stuck there for more than two hours and missed my flight. At that moment, I was so frustrated. I said to my mother who came along with me that I hated the United States. However, after that experience things got better. I tried to communicate with other students. At first, it was very hard to step out of my comfort zone. I was scared to make mistakes. I feared to communicate because my English was weak. I was afraid that I would lose my Japanese. However, I did not have any friend who can speak Thai, so it forced me to focus on my English. I am no longer afraid to face many challenges. I found Japanese friends. I overcame my fears.

I always think about the reasons why I came to the United States. Improving the second language is part of studying abroad. I think it helps me to learn other cultures and different ways of thinking. It helps me to have a wider outlook of the world after I have met so many people around the world. It helps me grow up and stand on my own because my family or my friends who always support me are not here, so I have to do everything by myself. It helps me love to make mistakes because I can learn new things. So, I always remember what my parents said to me “be brave and keep learning. You already have a chance to improve yourselves. Do not let it go.”

Don’t let your life drift away. Don’t let your emotions like fear control you – you have to control them. Don’t judge other people because you will learn something from them. Don’t fear to make mistakes. Don’t lose your hope because it will make you stronger. Step out of your cover and your will enjoy your new life.

I cannot say I already achieve all of my goals of studying abroad. I still have to learn many things to improve myself. However, I think to myself that I would not be a person who I am right now if my parents had never let me study aboard, and I  would not be joyful if I had never met my friends here. So I want to thank you to everyone who always supports me. Thank you.

Making the Best of What you Have

By Aristote Kipayko, ELP Graduate, Chatham Undergraduate Student

Asked to write a commencement speech to students graduating from the English Language Program, Aris writes, “We had better start looking at the light to see where we are going.” He urges the students to make the best of what they have now to have a great future.

About Aris: My name is Aristote Kipayko. I am from the Democratic Republic of Congo, and I plan to graduate with a double major in Economics and Management Information System at Chatham University, class of 2021. I chose to get into business because I believe that everything nowadays is related to business and money. I am interested to know the real use of money and the different impacts it can have on any individual.

Aris’s speech:

I’m pleased to be with you at this time today for your commencement to a new step in your journey. Most of you have gone through a lot in order to be here with us. It may look easy, but only you can know the pain and suffering you have encountered.

I assume that many of you had the same problem as me when arriving in Pittsburgh and trying to settle. For me, the Pittsburgh weather was the first challenge I faced. It could get so cold in a day just as it could get so warm as well. I come from Africa and most of you might know or heard that it is usually way warmer in Africa in comparison to America. Adapting to the cold weather in Pittsburgh was really hard.  Determination and desire to learn more were the keys to help me overcome that challenge. It helped me to stay strong and stay focused in class.

Apart from the weather, food in America was also a big challenge. I was surprised that the quality of the food here would be so bad. I felt that I had led myself into a dark journey. I realized that I was eating more organic food back to my country, and it took me about two months to get used to the food here. In order to move forward, I had to make it a small deal and move on. Just like Ron Shayka said, “When all you see are shadows, you never see light.” We had better start looking at the light to see where we are going.

Once again, I want to congratulate all of you for your achievements. We still all have a lot to achieve, but this is also a big step. Just like Steve Jobs said, “Stay Hungry and Stay Foolish.” Nothing is more important than always want to learn more. Success is a fruit from hard work and dedication. The future is in our hands. John Schaar wrote that “The future is not some place we are going to, but one we are creating. The paths to it are not found but made.” Therefore, you have to make the best of what you have now to have a great future.

The Best Environment for Learning and Growth

By Issareeyaporn (Wi) Praisuwanna, Chatham Undergradaute Student, International Student Ambassador

Email: Issareeyaporn.Prais@Chatham.edu

I’m Wi. I am a transfer international student from Olympic College in Washington State. All of my credits were able to transfer to the business program at Chatham University. I love Chatham University and Pittsburgh❤❤❤. The reason is that Chatham University provides me with a suitable program, small classes, friendly professors, nice friends with great diversity, but not too many international students, the best location, and the best environment for learning and growth.

– สวัสดีทุกคน

เราชื่อ วิ นะ เราเป็นเป็นนักเรียนต่างชาติมาจากประเทศไทยจ้า เราโอนหน่วยกิจมาจากวิทยาลัยแห่งหนึ่งในรัฐวอชิงตันนะ หน่วยกิจทั้งหมดของเราสามารถโอนมาใช้ในคณะบริหารของมหาลัย Chatham ได้ เราอยากบอกทุกคนว่า เราชอบมหาลัย Chatham และ เมือง Pittsburgh มากกกกกกกกกก เพราะนักศึกษาต่อห้องน้อย มีโปรแกรมที่เราอยากเรียน เจอเพื่อนจากหลายเชื้อชาติ แต่ก็ไม่ได้มีนักเรียนต่างชาติเยอะจนเกินไป มหาลัยตั้งอยู่ในที่ๆไม่วุ่นวาย แต่ก็ไม่ห่างจากที่ซื้อของมากจนเกินไป นอกจากนี้มหาลัยก็มีบรรยากาศที่ดี

Begin Your Study Abroad Journey with Chatham English Language Program

By Duyen Nguyen, Former ELP Student

Choosing Chatham English Language Program to begin my “Study Abroad” journey was the best decision in my life.

Going Apes in North Park

Xin chào,

Mình là Duyên Nguyễn, sinh viên của chương trình English Language Program khóa mùa xuân và mùa hè năm 2017 tại Chatham University.

Đối với mình được đi du học là một cơ hội rất lớn mà chính bản thân mình cũng không ngờ tới, nhưng lựa chọn Chatham University là trường để bắt đầu cuộc hành trình mang tên “Du Học” thì đây chính là quyết định đúng đắn nhất của cuộc đời mình.

Nếu để diễn tả Chatham University trong ba cụm từ, mình sẽ nói: khuôn viên tuyệt đẹp, giáo viên tuyệt vời, và chương trình học cực kì linh hoạt. Chatham University là một môi trường hoàn hảo để tập trung vào việc học, nhưng không những thế Chatham cũng có những hoạt động ngoại khóa để sinh viên khám phá vẻ đẹp của Pittsburgh. Có lẽ rất nhiều người sẽ nghĩ rằng chương trình Tiếng Anh thì khá là khô khan. Nhưng giáo viên và các hoạt động tại Chatham sẽ khiến mọi người có cách nhìn khác về những khóa học Tiếng Anh. Nhờ những chương trình học linh hoạt, học Tiếng Anh sẽ không đơn giản chỉ học về những ngữ pháp, từ vựng hay lý thuyết, mà giáo viên tại Chatham sẽ khiến các bài giảng trở nên thú vị hơn bằng những bài học về văn hóa nước Mỹ, những cuộc thảo luận sôi nổi đầy tiếng cười, và cả những bộ phim.

Trong suốt hai khóa học ở Chatham, mình có thể nói rằng đó là khoảng thời gian không thể nào quên được.

For more information: email internationalaffairs@chatham.edu or call (1)412-365-1388.  Visit our website at www.chatham.edu/elp.