May 27, 2020
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An Introduction to Academic Video Online (AVON): Feel-Good Videos to Stream During Quarantine

The JKM Library has a new database worth checking out! Academic Video Online (AVON) is a premier database that holds over 68,000 videos spanning a variety of disciplines and subjects. Whether you’re in the mood for a documentary, news, feature films, or interviews, AVON has access across the board. Explore videos of different genres, lengths, and age, and expand your horizons; search for the exact title you’re looking for, or just peruse the homepage! The database’s wide variety provides a well-rounded collection of both educational and entertaining resources, and Chatham users can see it all! Here’s a few titles that both highlight the diversity of AVON and can lift your spirits!

Image of the cast of Candide1.) Candide, libretto by Leonard Bernstein

Bernstein’s operatic adaptation of Voltaire novella comes to life in the 2004 production with the New York Philharmonic, featuring the musical stylings of theatre giants like Kristin Chenoweth and Patti LuPone. The show tells the story of the eponymous protagonist as he traverses through adulthood meeting bizarre new people and learning important life lessons. Candide boasts an impressive score full of bright, exuberant numbers and an overall feeling of comedy and joy throughout. Viewers can expect to laugh their way all the way through this musical adventure. A true testament to the quality of AVON’s performing arts selection, Candide is fun for everyone.

Film poster for Land Ho!2.) Land Ho!, directed by Aaron Katz and Martha Stephens

Here’s one raucous comedy evokes the feeling of the ’80s road trip movies, but turns the trope on its head with its elderly protagonist. This feature film follows former brothers-in-law Mitch and Colin as they attempt to relive their youth while taking a trip through Iceland. This indie darling is simple and character-driven, and while it has the occasional heavy moment, the majority of Land Ho! is chock full of quirk and witty humor. Coupled with the beautiful scenery of Reykjavik, this movie is a short and sweet romp that prioritizes mischief, friendship, and the idea that we all need someone to be there for us every now and then.

Film poster for Awake3.) Awake: The Life of Yogananda, directed by Pablo Di Florio and Lisa Leeman

In this documentary, the life of acclaimed yogi Paramahansa Yogananda serves as the subject. His story of enlightenment and self-discovery is juxtaposed against his personal struggles growing up, and paints an incredible picture of his journey. Often credited as bringing yoga to the west via his memoir Autobiography of a Yogi, Yogananda’s grounded view of life and practice of self-realization helped to propel yoga into the mainstream. This documentary would be a great fit both for those who want to further inform their practice of yoga, meditation, and mindfulness as well as those brand new to the topic and wanting to learn more.

Film poster for Fermented4.) Fermented, directed by Jonathan Cianfrani

Part science, part history, all educational, this documentary explores the roots of one of oldest forms of food preservation, perfect for the sustainability-savvy viewer. Learn all about the different ways that fermentation can occur, from pickling to making alcohol, and their importance to the world of food! Host Edward Lee is incredibly passionate about exploring this food practice, and his enthusiasm could very well extend to the viewer. Considering the growing popularity of food studies and sustainable food practice, this film would serve as a great supplement to learning about current food trends–canning and pickling may make a quarantine comeback!

Film poster for Mister Rogers It's You I Like5.) Mister Rogers: It’s You I Like, directed by John Paulson

Nothing says “feel-good” quite like Mister Rogers. 2019 gave us two great movies, Won’t You Be My Neighbor and A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, but this earlier documentary pays homage directly to Mister Rogers’ television legacy. Highlighting some of the show’s most memorable clips and performances, and featuring interviews with celebrities on how Mister Rogers shaped their lives, It’s You I Like gives an inside glimpse of the importance of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood in its 900 episode run. You’re guaranteed to finish this documentary with a smile on your face, and an even greater understanding of the importance of this hometown hero on children’s television.

These are just a few of the thousands of titles available through AVON. Whether you’re interested in a three-minute mindfulness video, a fashion show, or a virtual trip to the orchestra, AVON has something for everyone. Watch with your significant other, your kids, or with friends, maybe host a Zoom watch party–regardless of what you choose, the possibilities seem endless! Access the database here, and remember to also check out our other available library resources during our closure. Happy watching!

Carina Stopenski is the Access Services Associate at Chatham University’s Jennie King Mellon Library. They started out as a student worker while getting their creative writing degree at Chatham, and have since started working on their Master’s of Library Science at Clarion University. They enjoy games of both the board and video persuasion, vegan baking, and reading graphic novels.

August 29, 2018
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Textbooks in the Library!

For the first time ever, the library is able to offer limited textbooks for checkout! We understand how expensive textbooks can be, which is why we have embraced an idea brought to us by members of the Chatham Student Government. We now accept student textbook donations for our circulating collection. What does this mean? Well, it means that you as a student can check out any of the textbooks we have in our limited collection for a full semester to use for classwork. You can browse the textbook collection on the third floor next to our Olkes collection. You can find them on the shelf to the right as you walk out of the elevator. If you find a book you think will be helpful, you can check it out at the Circulation Desk downstairs on the first floor.

Because these textbooks were donations from your peers, they might not be the most recent editions. This also means that our selection is still small since we rely on you for textbook donations. So what if you want to donate your old textbooks? First of all, thank you! You’re helping your fellow students decrease the cost of their education. In order to donate your textbooks to the library, bring them to either the Reference or Circulation Desk on the first floor.


Faculty are also encouraged to donate materials and make use of our Course Reserve service by putting materials (such as books, DVDs, or articles) on reserve in the library for your students to access. You can learn more about Course Reserve here.

We know that there will still be books for class that you won’t be able to find in our library, but don’t worry! You can still check E-ZBorrow or ILLiad to see if another library has what you need. If you have any questions about our textbook collection or how to find books for class, please contact a librarian! We’re available through email, phone, chat, text, and in person at the Reference Desk, and we’re always happy to help!

February 11, 2016
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Streaming Movies for Black History Month

Think you might spend the entire weekend indoors, huddled under a blanket, drinking hot beverages, and watching movies? If so, we have an exciting new database just for you: Swank! Swank features 300 streaming movies, from current popular titles to classics to documentaries.

With February’s celebration of Black History Month, we’d like to point out that Swank includes a number of great titles you can watch:

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glory

For a full list of the 300 movies available, please click here (Excel file). Access to Swank is on a trial basis only and will end on June 30, 2016.

Swank requires Google Widevine, which you may need to install in your browser. It should just prompt you through the installation process, but if you have any difficulty, please contact a librarian for assistance.

Please note: Swank movies do not include public performance rights and are only intended for individual or classroom use.

June 10, 2014
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Moving to EBSCO: PsycINFO, Medline, etc

alertOn July 1st or shortly after, the following library databases will move from the Ovid platform to EBSCO:

  • EBM Reviews (will be renamed Cochrane Collection)
  • Medline
  • PsycINFO (including PsycArticles)
  • PsycTests
  • SocINDEX (replaces Social Work Abstracts)

If you have any saved search histories, projects, articles, alerts, etc within Ovid, you will no longer have access to those as of July 1. You will want to take a screen shot of this information so that you can replicate it within the relevant EBSCO database. If you would like assistance with this, please ask a librarian using the following options:

April 9, 2014
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Gwen Ifill Awarded Elsie Hillman Chair

elsieOn April 2nd Chatham University was honored to host Gwen Ifill, the Pennsylvania Center for Women and Politics’ 2014 Elsie Hillman Chair.  Ifill, who works as moderator and managing editor of Washington Week and senior correspondent and co-anchor for the PBS Newshour, delivered a speech entitled “Politics, Policy, and Reality: What’s Really Going on in Washington.”  With a long history in Washington, D.C.’s halls of power covering politics and moderating two vice-presidential debates, Ifill shared with attendees her experience and respect for women past, present, and future.

Ifill eloquently reflects on her evening spent with Elsie Hillman on PBS’ website, how she admires and deeply respects Hillman’s work in politics as a woman.  Hillman’s rise as a strong leader in Pittsburgh, PA and as a principal member of the Republican National Convention are recorded in Never a spectator : the political life of Elsie Hillman by Kathy McCauley–on the New Books display on the first floor of the JKM Library–and served as inspiration for Ifill.

July 13, 2013
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Oxford Islamic Studies Database

Please take a few minutes to check out Jennie King Mellon’s newest database, Oxford Islamic Studies Online. Chatham students have been given special access to this amazing resource as part of the library’s Muslim Journeys grant.

The database features a wide range of information by well-respected scholars on all topics related to Islam including Islamic history, people, places, and culture. On top of this there are full color images, maps, and many primary documents to explore.

As mentioned above this is a special opportunity that has been given to our library and the database will only be available until April 2014. Don’t wait.

June 22, 2013
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ILLiad is here

The Jennie King Mellon Library is very pleased to let you all know that we now have an automated system to process interlibrary loans called ILLiad. This program is used by hundreds of university libraries across the country and now Chatham users we be able to share its benefits.
ILLiad provides a more efficient process for receiving the books and journal articles you request. Users will also have more options including choosing which e-mail they want to be notified by when materials come in and can view the status of each request. Please visit library.chatham.edu to immediately open your account.
Lastly, just a reminder that close to half of all inter-library loan requests are for materials that Chatham already has! Please always check the JKM Library’s JournalFinder feature at http://journalfinder.wtcox.com/chatham/ to double check for articles before sending a request and never hesitate to speak with one of the reference librarians first. It’s our job!
Illiad 3

April 16, 2013
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Muslim Journeys Bookshelf

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The Jennie King Mellon Library is one of 840 libraries and state humanities councils across the country selected to receive the Bridging Cultures Bookshelf: Muslim Journeys from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the American Library Association (ALA). The program aims to familiarize public audiences in the United States with the people, places, history, faith and cultures of Muslims in the United States and around the world.

The Muslim Journeys Bookshelf includes the following titles, organized by theme:

American Stories:

Connected Histories:

Literary Reflections:

Pathways of Faith

Points of View

Art Architecture and Film

The Muslim Journeys bookshelf is located on the main floor of the JKM Library next to the New Books display.  When you walk into the library, just turn to your right to check out these great books located along the windows!

April 3, 2013
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Sandman #1 “Preludes and Nocturnes”

sandmanIn 1916 a cult attempts to capture death but they are thwarted when they inadvertently imprison the Sandman.  Held hostage for 72 years by the cult, Dreams (also called Morpheus) is unable to return to the realm of dreams.  As a result, an epidemic of “sleeping sickness” crosses the globe, causing thousands to slip into an unshakable slumber.

Finally freed from his captors in 1988, Dreams must reclaim his kingdom from chaos, but he is badly weakened from his captivity.  To regain his full powers, Dreams sets out on a journey to track down a serial killer with mind control powers and a demon in Hell that is set on shaming the Sandman.

Written by award winning novelist Neil Gaiman (Stardust, The Graveyard Book, Good Omens, Smoke and Mirrors), Sandman #1 is a dark and gritty storyline that entices and captivates the reader.  Although Sandman is a comic book, this is not a story for young readers.  Readers will enjoy Dreams’ somber and philosophical nature as his journey entangles him with citizens of this world and many others.

Reviewed by Melissa Frye, JKM Library Student Worker

March 19, 2013
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Who Watches the Watchmen?

watchmenAlan Moore sets his Hugo Award-winning graphic novel in the political dystopia of the 1980s.  Published in comic book form between September 1986 and October 1987, Moore manages to encapsulate the nuclear tensions of the United States and the Soviet Union during the height of the Cold War.

Moore focuses his narrative on an unlikely group of costumed vigilantes called “The Crimebusters.”  The Crimebusters are the second generation of “heroes” that patrol the streets of New York City but they are very different from their idyllic 1950’s predecessors.  As a faceless enemy begins to kill off the Crimebusters, the fractured group revisits their pasts in an attempt to decipher a mystery that threatens the world.

The multiple threads of characters, history, politics, and encroaching world destruction are masterfully woven together by Moore to create an intense and gripping drama.  In the end, the story leaves the reader questioning her own grasp of morality vs. humanity.

A great read not only for comic book fans but avid readers as well.

Reviewed by Melissa Frye, JKM Library Student Worker

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