June 26, 2018
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Interactive Display: Mental Health Awareness Month

Mental Health Resources

Chatham University Counseling Services

Website:
https://www.chatham.edu/campus-life/services/counseling.cfm

Phone:
(412) 365-1282

Hours:
9:00am-5:00pm M-F

Location:
Woodland Hall, Ground Level

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

1-800-273-8255 (For Veterans press 1)

UPMC re:SOLVE CRISIS NETWORK

333 North Braddock Ave.
Pittsburgh, PA 15208
Tel:1-888-796-8226 call any time and speak with a trained counselor

JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN’S SERVICES

5743 Bartlett Street
Pittsburgh PA 15217
Tel: 412-521-3800
Email: info@squirrelhillpsych.org
http://www.squirrelhillpsych.org/

NEW HORIZONS PEER SUPPORT DROP IN CENTER

Provides recovery focused classes, advocates on site, social activities, computer lab, and peer support. Must be a resident of Allegheny County and over the age of 18 with mental health challenges.
616 Lincoln Ave., Bellevue, PA 15202
Tel: 412-766-8060
www.peer-support.org and click on services link

Find even more resources and services for mental health and more at Be Well! Pittsburgh https://bewellpgh.org/


April 23, 2018
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National Poetry Month 2018: Suggested Reads!

April is National Poetry Month, and we at the JKM Library have a soft spot in our literary hearts for poetry. This month, student workers Alie Davis and Carina Stopenski worked together to design and curate our Main Book Display. Items selected ranged from classics like Sylvia Plath to Chatham students’ chapbooks and everything in between.

While all the poetry collections on display are worth checking out and exploring, Alie Davis has selected three that stand out to her. Read her bite-sized reviews below for poetry collections you can check out today!

Andrea Gibson’s first book, Pole Dancing to Gospel Hymns, inspires action in all of its readers. This collection is brimming with brutal tenderness. Gibson covers topics that are relevant to the current political climate. This collection is full of poems about gender, love, violence, and an overwhelming optimism for surviving no matter what.

 

Lori Jakiela, a local Pittsburgh poet, released her chapbook, Big Fish in 2016. This collection sings with humor, playfulness, and light, but does not shy away from the hard things. Jakiela writes about landscape, motherhood, and giant fish sandwiches. Big Fish is a rich collection to dive into and swim through.

 

Lighthead by Terrance Hayes is his fourth collection to be published. Always blurring the line between story and song, and reality and dream, Hayes engages with how we ground ourselves in the everyday and how we construct experience. Musical and dream-like, Lighthead offers meditations on desires and history. Masterful precision of language and sound moves this collection to a Must-Read for all.

January 12, 2018
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Chatham Leadership: The Presidency of Cora Helen Coolidge

The Chatham University Archives invites you to explore Chatham Leadership: The Presidency of Cora Helen Coolidge, an exploration of a president whose ceaseless dedication to women’s education steered Chatham through one of its most tumultuous chapters.

Presented as an extension of Chatham Leadership: A Presidential Timeline, this exhibit aims to convey both the impact Coolidge had on Chatham as well as the profound and indelible impression she had on the lives of students from her era.

The exhibit is on view in the lounge of the Women’s Institute in Braun Hall, and we encourage your to stop by and explore the legacy of President Coolidge.

Pennsylvania College for Women President Cora Helen Coolidge

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November 13, 2017
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Connect with the Library on Instagram and Spotify

There are so many opportunities to connect and interact with the Jennie King Mellon Library online and in person, and we recently added two more: Instagram and Spotify! Our new Instagram account (@jkmlibrary) features library news, updates, and shenanigans. Be sure to follow us for #NewBookTuesdays and #BookfaceFridays. You’ll also get to know our staff and librarians better, as we post fun pictures of our recommendations, displays, and exciting library life.

And yes, you heard correctly, the library has a Spotify account. What is Spotify? It’s a music streaming service that allows those with accounts to listen to over 30 million songs for free and create and share playlists. Library staff members love music of all genres and styles. We’re hoping to share our love of music with the rest of the Chatham community in a way that enhances your experience at the library and allows you to get to know us better.

Our playlists are specially crafted by librarians and library staff, and while they are certainly educational, they’re also a lot of fun. We create new playlists regularly for different purposes. A playlist could correspond with one of our in-library displays, be a Staff Spotlight playlist of recommendations put together by just one staff member, or something that our student workers have crafted!

Our Native American Heritage Month book display is on the first floor of the JKM Library.

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November 1, 2017
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The Year of Indonesia Library Displays

Every year, Chatham University chooses a Global Focus, and the 2017-2018 school year is the Year of Indonesia. In order to highlight Indonesian culture and society, the JKM Library has partnered with Dr. Greg Galford on displays that celebrate Indonesian culture and help educate our Chatham community.

The first is a display of beautiful Javanese batiks purchased in Yogyakarta, Indonesia by Dr. Galford. Each of the batiks on display are incredibly beautiful, but one in particular features golden wax detailing that is truly stunning. The batik has been the source of some controversy over the years concerning the appropriation of Indonesian culture by many of its neighbors. A 2009 New York Times article detailed the struggle for cultural ownership of the batik between Indonesia and Malaysia. This was just one of many conflicts between the two nations. In September of that year, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, known as UNESCO, made the decision to add the batik to its Intangible Cultural Heritage list, meaning that its cultural meaning and significance is now protected and attributed to Indonesia (Gelling, 2009).

According to UNESCO’s Intangible Cultural Heritage list, the batik is deeply rooted in Indonesian culture and plays a big part in the lives of Indonesians. Different intricate patterns are worn for everyday activities, special events, marriages, pregnancy, and other life events. Batiks feature at the birth of a child and the death of an elder. They are even incorporated into entertainment, such as puppet shows. The incredible designs drawn by craftsmen are indicative of the wide range of cultural influences Indonesia has been exposed to over the centuries. You will see elements of “Arabic calligraphy, European bouquets and Chinese phoenixes to Japanese cherry blossoms and Indian or Persian peacocks.” (Indonesian Batik, 2017)

The process includes drawing beautiful designs on fabrics in hot wax which then helps to control which part of the fabric accepts the dyes and colors. This process is repeated on the same piece of fabric until the desired design is achieved (Indonesian Batik, 2017). The results are breath-taking. You can see video examples and up-close images of this process on UNESCO’s Intangible Cultural Heritage website.

In another article by the New York Times that discussed the attempts to revive the batik tradition in the 1990s, batik historian T.T. Soerjanto explains how the tradition dates back 2,000 years and was first mentioned in the 15th century in the court records of Pakubuwono V, the King of Solo (Rabin, 1990). Take a look at the detailed fabric scans below of some of the batiks we have on display. Come in person to see our gilded batik in all its glory.

You can find our batik display on the first floor of the library hanging on the wall partition near the elevator. Feel free to get up close and even touch the fabric, but please proceed with care.

The second display is a collection of 18 books on Indonesia, provided by Dr. Galford. These books, which are both fiction and non-fiction, range in topic from history to civil engineering and infrastructure. While you are more than welcome to enjoy these books in the library, please do not remove them from the building. Below is a full list of titles in case you are interested in finding a copy for yourself!

  • Under Construction: The Politics of Urban Space and Housing During the Decolonization of Indonesia by Freek Colombijn
  • Island of Bali by Miguel Covarrubias
  • Planet of Slums by Mike Davis
  • The Traditional Architecture of Indonesia by Barry Dawson and John Gillow
  • Balinese Dance, Drama & Music: A Guide to the Performing Arts of Bali by Wayan Dibia and Rucina Ballinger with illustration by Barbara Anello
  • The Indonesia Reader: History, Culture by Tineke Hellwig and Eric Tagliacozzo
  • The Year of Living Dangerously by Christopher J. Koch
  • Behind the Postcolonial: Architecture, Urban Space and Political Cultures in Indonesia by Abidin Kusno
  • The Appearance of Memory: Mnemonic Practices of Architecture and Urban Form in Indonesia by Abidin Kusno
  • The Past in the Present: Architecture in Indonesia by Peter Nas
  • Indonesia, Etc.: Exploring the Improbable Nation by Elizabeth Pisani
  • Creative Batik by Rosi Robinson
  • A Nation in Waiting: Indonesia’s Search for Stability by Adam Schwartz
  • Indonesia: Peoples and Histories by Jean Gelman Taylor
  • Indonesia: A Lonely Planet Travel Survival Kit by Justine Vaisutis
  • Malay Archipelago by Alfred Russel Wallace
  • The Living House: An Anthropology of Architecture in South-East Asia by Roxana Waterson
  • Krakatoa: The day the world exploded by Simon Winchester

We hope you enjoy Chatham’s Year of Indonesia! Take a moment to view our displays the next time you find yourself on the first floor of the JKM Library.

 

References

Indonesian Batik. (2017). Retrieved from https://ich.unesco.org/en/RL/indonesian-batik-00170

Gelling, P. (2009, September 14). Score One for Indonesia in the War Over Batik. The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/15/world/asia/15iht-batik.html?mcubz=0

Rabin, R.C. (1990, February 18). The Intricate Patterning of Batik. The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/1990/02/18/travel/the-intricate-patterning-of-batik.html?pagewanted=all&mcubz=0

October 6, 2017
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Chatham Leadership: A Presidential Timeline

Chatham Leadership:
A Presidential Timeline

The Chatham University Archives invites you to explore Chatham Leadership: A Presidential Timeline, a chronology and account of the remarkable individuals who have shaped Chatham and made it the institution it is today.

President Spencer Inauguration, 1935

Founded in 1869 by Reverend William Trimble Beatty and supporters from the Shadyside Presbyterian Church, the Pennsylvania Female College actualized the growing sentiment of the times that women—and therefore society—benefited intellectually, socially, and morally from a liberal arts education that had commonly been limited to men.

Rather than offering courses in needlework, china painting, and English, as other women’s schools in Pittsburgh had throughout the 18th and 19th centuries, the Pennsylvania Female College offered courses in astronomy, chemistry, Greek, and other rigorous subjects that prepared women for professional careers.

Over the next 148 years, the school changed names, first to Pennsylvania College for Women then to Chatham College (now Chatham University), and welcomed generations of students, faculty, and leaders dedicated to creating a productive and conscientious society through liberal arts education. The 21st century brought the Falk School of Sustainability, Eden Hall Campus, undergraduate coeducation, and Chatham’s 16th President, Dr. David Finegold.

Buckets and Blossoms, 2017

The Chatham University Archives and the JKM Library congratulate Dr. Finegold on his inauguration as he joins a historic lineage of Chatham leaders.  We welcome the Chatham community to take a look back to the history of our school and the men and women who have served as its leader.  Explore this lineage below and through materials on display in the lobby of the JKM Library.

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August 25, 2017
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A Room with a View to Chatham History from the University Archives

Have you ever noticed that a few of the group study rooms in the JKM Library are named?  Have you ever wondered why or whom they are named for?  The Chatham University Archives & Special Collections is thrilled to help solve these questions with our new exhibit, A Room with a View to Chatham History, which explores the lives of the individuals who’ve been honored with a room named in their honor at the JKM Library.

History on view in the Elliott Room, JKM Library

With this exhibit, on view in each of the named study rooms, we invite you to explore the legacies of Dr. Mary A. McGuire, Dr. Mable A. Elliot, Dr. Edgar M. Foltin, Laberta Dysart, and Arthur L. Davis.  Each of these Chatham professors made significant contributions to their field of expertise and contributed to the development of Chatham as we know it today.

Dr. Mable Elliot and the Elliot Room

One of the most notable professors honored as the namesake for a study room is Dr. Mable A. Elliot, Professor of Sociology from 1949 until 1965 (Room 201). Dr. Elliot earned three degrees from Northwestern University (bachelor of arts, master of arts, and doctor of philosophy). Appointed as an adviser to the U.N. Commission on Social and Economic Affairs, Dr. Elliot was also the first women elected president of the Society for the Study of Social Problems (click here for more info). Dr. Elliot was described as both a feminist and a pacifist, and her criticism of U.S. criminal policies and anti-war activism led to the creation of an FBI file which was maintained for over 30 years. Interested in learning more about Dr. Elliot?

Biography of Dr. Elliot in the JKM Library book collection

Take a look at the book Mabel Agnes Elliott: Pioneering Feminist, Pacifist Sociologist in the JKM Library collection (click here  to find it in the library catalog).

Laberta Dysart and the Laberta Dysart Study Room

Some members of the Chatham Community may be familiar with Laberta Dysart, namesake for Room 202, as author of the first history of Chatham, Chatham College: The First Ninety Years (available online through the University Archives here), but her contribution to Chatham does not stop there.  A professor of history at Chatham from 1926 until 1958, she was active in Chatham’s Colloquium Club and in the local chapter of the American Association of University Professors.  The University Archive’s Laberta Dysart Collection, click here for the collection finding aid, contains a variety of records documenting her impact on the university, including an article from the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette about her retirement, an award honoring her service to Chatham, and the eulogy delivered by a former student and longtime friend, Eleanor Bartberger Dearborn `31, at a campus memorial held in her honor.

Pittsburgh Post Gazette article in honor of Labaerta Dysart’s retirement.

Chatham College Centennial Award given to Laberta Dysart

Eulogy for Laberta Dysart written by Eleanor Barbeger Dearborn ’31

The Chatham University Archives welcomes further research on these individuals, on the history of campus, and how the Chatham community continues to shape the environment.  Stop by the library to view A Room with a View to Chatham History or contact the University Archives at x1212 or M.Tighe@chatham.edu for more information.

June 1, 2017
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Chatham Summers with the University Archives on View a the JKM

The JKM Library and the Archives & Special Collections are pleased to present Chatham Summers with the University Archives, a media exhibition highlighting the rich documentation in our photographic collections.  Items on view document life at Chatham during the summer and feature images of campus sports, events, and more.

Lantern Slide Depicting PCW Tennis, c. 1905

The exhibit includes visual material from Chatham’s earliest years and from more recent years.

1888 Sketch of Students Wearing Sun Protection

Though things may seem a bit quieter around campus than during the fall and spring semesters, these images reveal that Chatham students have always pursued a wide variety of activities, regardless of the heat, humidity, or era.

We’ve included a few of our favorites in this post, but stop by the JKM Library to view the exhibit in its entirety!

Taking a Spin Around Campus, c. 1952-1953

 

Diving Practice, c. 1950s

 

Chatham vs. Robert Morris, 1980

Not around campus?  Additional records from Chatham history, including yearbooks, newspapers, photographs, and other records are accessible online at the web site for the University Archives & Special Collections (click here).  Or, stop by the Archives Reading Room to learn more about Chatham history.

February 23, 2017
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A Quick Peek into the History of the Minor Bird

Did you know that Chatham’s literary magazine Minor Bird has flown through a few different iterations since it was first hatched in 1929?  Was your interest in the graphics used for the Minor Bird piqued by the new exhibit, Objects of Study: Selections from the Artifact Collections of the Chatham University Archives,  on view at the Women’s Institute?  Did you happen to see a few eye-catching illustrations of Minor Bird covers from the 1950s and 1960s in the JKM Library Newsletter and wonder if there are any more compelling visuals?  Yes?  Then you are in luck!

We, the staff of the Chatham University Archives, selected a handful of our very favorite Minor Bird covers and we’re thrilled to share them with you here.  And, if your appetite for Minor Bird is still not quenched, you can flip through fifteen years’ worth of literary explorations by Chatham students online through the Internet Archive!

The Minor Bird first appeared as a simple, line drawing in 1929.  This logo was used until 1939.

Minor Bird front cover, June 1936

The line drawing also appeared at the top of each page.

Minor Bird, Spring 1929

After a brief stint under the umbrella of the student newspaper, the Minor Bird emerged in 1949 with a very different look.

Minor Bird front cover, Spring 1949

Several variations on the 1949 theme were used, including this Minor Bird cover from 1950.

Minor Bird front cover, Spring 1950

Lots of change happened in the 1950s and the Minor Bird logo was no exception.

Minor Bird front cover, Spring 1951

 

Minor Bird front cover, Spring 1952

 

Minor Bird front cover, January 1955

The Minor Bird covers from the 1960’s are particularly evocative of this expressive era.

Minor Bird front cover, Winter 1967

 

Minor Bird front cover, Spring 1969

 

Minor Bird front cover, Fall 1969

 

Minor Bird rear cover, Fall 1969

The Chatham University Archives include numerous publications by the Chatham community, including additional issues of the Minor Bird, the Sorosis, and Faces & Places.  Stop by the University Archives or contact Molly Tighe, Archivist and Public Services Librarian, for more information.

 

 

December 5, 2016
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Objects of Study: Selections from the Artifact Collections at the Chatham University Archives on view at the Women’s Institute

Have you ever wondered what kind of stuff we keep in the University Archives?  Been curious if there is anything other than letters, photos, and newspapers being saved as part of the record of the university?  Now is your chance to find out!  A new exhibit, Objects of Study: Selections from the Artifact Collections at the Chatham University Archives, is on view in the lounge of the Women’s Institute. Stop by the exhibit to explore the role played by artifacts and objects in documenting the history of the university and to discover some truly remarkable stories about campus, Chatham alums, and more.

One of our favorite items on view is a copper coffer that was retrieved from the cornerstone of the old Dilworth Hall when it was demolished in 1953.  “Dilworth Hall demolished? But, what’s that building just up the hill from the Carriage House?” you might ask.  That’s actually Dilworth Hall II!  The first Dilworth Hall, Dilworth Hall I, was attached to Berry Hall I.  Here’s a picture of both halls as they appeared in a 1906 issue of Sorosis, the student magazine of the day:

View of Dilworth Hall I and Berry Hall I at PCW in 1906

View of Dilworth Hall I and Berry Hall I at PCW in 1906

Both Dilworth Hall I and Berry Hall I were demolished in 1953 to make way for the upgraded academic buildings we still use today: Braun, Falk, and Coolidge.  Here’s a couple photos of the demolition:

View of Demolition of Berry Hall I and Dilworth Hall I at PCW in 1953

View of Demolition of Berry Hall I and Dilworth Hall I at PCW in 1953

View of Berry Hall I and Dilworth Hall I during demolition with Chapel steeple visible in background

View of Berry Hall I and Dilworth Hall I during demolition with Chapel steeple visible in background

I bet you are wondering what was found inside the copper coffer, right?  Check out this article from The Pittsburgh Press (another relic from a bygone era) and read about the discovery.

Newspaper clipping about PCW time capsule discovery

Newspaper clipping about PCW time capsule discovery

The exhibit, Objects of Study: Selections from the Artifact Collections at the Chatham University Archives , features little known bits of history about Berry Hall I, The Minor Bird, and campus dining.

Intrigued?  Here’s some pics to help wet your whistle:

Alumnae Napkin Rings at from University Archives

Alumnae Napkin Rings at from University Archives

History of The Minor Bird Logo

History of The Minor Bird Logo

Check out the copper coffer and other relics from the history of our university in the Women’s Institute or stop by the University Archives in the JKM Library to further explore our history.

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