August 25, 2017
by library
0 comments

A Room with a View to Chatham History from the University Archives

Have you ever noticed that a few of the group study rooms in the JKM Library are named?  Have you ever wondered why or whom they are named for?  The Chatham University Archives & Special Collections is thrilled to help solve these questions with our new exhibit, A Room with a View to Chatham History, which explores the lives of the individuals who’ve been honored with a room named in their honor at the JKM Library.

History on view in the Elliott Room, JKM Library

With this exhibit, on view in each of the named study rooms, we invite you to explore the legacies of Dr. Mary A. McGuire, Dr. Mable A. Elliot, Dr. Edgar M. Foltin, Laberta Dysart, and Arthur L. Davis.  Each of these Chatham professors made significant contributions to their field of expertise and contributed to the development of Chatham as we know it today.

Dr. Mable Elliot and the Elliot Room

One of the most notable professors honored as the namesake for a study room is Dr. Mable A. Elliot, Professor of Sociology from 1949 until 1965 (Room 201). Dr. Elliot earned three degrees from Northwestern University (bachelor of arts, master of arts, and doctor of philosophy). Appointed as an adviser to the U.N. Commission on Social and Economic Affairs, Dr. Elliot was also the first women elected president of the Society for the Study of Social Problems (click here for more info). Dr. Elliot was described as both a feminist and a pacifist, and her criticism of U.S. criminal policies and anti-war activism led to the creation of an FBI file which was maintained for over 30 years. Interested in learning more about Dr. Elliot?

Biography of Dr. Elliot in the JKM Library book collection

Take a look at the book Mabel Agnes Elliott: Pioneering Feminist, Pacifist Sociologist in the JKM Library collection (click here  to find it in the library catalog).

Laberta Dysart and the Laberta Dysart Study Room

Some members of the Chatham Community may be familiar with Laberta Dysart, namesake for Room 202, as author of the first history of Chatham, Chatham College: The First Ninety Years (available online through the University Archives here), but her contribution to Chatham does not stop there.  A professor of history at Chatham from 1926 until 1958, she was active in Chatham’s Colloquium Club and in the local chapter of the American Association of University Professors.  The University Archive’s Laberta Dysart Collection, click here for the collection finding aid, contains a variety of records documenting her impact on the university, including an article from the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette about her retirement, an award honoring her service to Chatham, and the eulogy delivered by a former student and longtime friend, Eleanor Bartberger Dearborn `31, at a campus memorial held in her honor.

Pittsburgh Post Gazette article in honor of Labaerta Dysart’s retirement.

Chatham College Centennial Award given to Laberta Dysart

Eulogy for Laberta Dysart written by Eleanor Barbeger Dearborn ’31

The Chatham University Archives welcomes further research on these individuals, on the history of campus, and how the Chatham community continues to shape the environment.  Stop by the library to view A Room with a View to Chatham History or contact the University Archives at x1212 or M.Tighe@chatham.edu for more information.

June 1, 2017
by library
0 comments

Chatham Summers with the University Archives on View a the JKM

The JKM Library and the Archives & Special Collections are pleased to present Chatham Summers with the University Archives, a media exhibition highlighting the rich documentation in our photographic collections.  Items on view document life at Chatham during the summer and feature images of campus sports, events, and more.

Lantern Slide Depicting PCW Tennis, c. 1905

The exhibit includes visual material from Chatham’s earliest years and from more recent years.

1888 Sketch of Students Wearing Sun Protection

Though things may seem a bit quieter around campus than during the fall and spring semesters, these images reveal that Chatham students have always pursued a wide variety of activities, regardless of the heat, humidity, or era.

We’ve included a few of our favorites in this post, but stop by the JKM Library to view the exhibit in its entirety!

Taking a Spin Around Campus, c. 1952-1953

 

Diving Practice, c. 1950s

 

Chatham vs. Robert Morris, 1980

Not around campus?  Additional records from Chatham history, including yearbooks, newspapers, photographs, and other records are accessible online at the web site for the University Archives & Special Collections (click here).  Or, stop by the Archives Reading Room to learn more about Chatham history.

March 31, 2017
by library
0 comments

Prizewinning Edible Books

Our 6th annual celebration of the International Edible Book Festival was a really fun event! If you missed it, here are the highlights.

We had three fantastic judges

Dr. Carrie Tippen, Dr. Heather McNaugher, & Sophie Slesinger

who, after some very serious deliberation,

selected four of our five prizewinning edible books:

Best Tasting
Maryem Aslam, Harry Potter
(chocolate oreo ball snitches)

 

Most Sustainable
Molly Tighe, Seitanic VS
(Satanic Verses)

Most Creative Literary Interpretation
Kate Emory, Julius Caesar

Grand Prize:
Amy Lee Heinlen, A Good Man is Hard to Find

The final prize was determined by the attendees, who voted for their favorite book. The winner of this popular vote prize was:

Maria, Trump: The Art of the Deal

Everyone seemed to have a great time and the library lobby was packed:

Want to see ALL the books submitted? Check out the pictures on our Facebook page!

Also, fun fact: The Wikipedia page for the Edible Book Festival has featured a book from our 2012 event since April 2013 (and we didn’t add it!)! We’re famous!

If you missed this year’s event, don’t worry! There’s always next year, and you can even start planning your entry now. All Chatham students, staff, and faculty are invited to submit an edible book.

March 14, 2017
by library
0 comments

You’re Invited: International Edible Book Festival

FREE FOOD! FABULOUS PRIZES!

It’s the event you’ve been waiting for all year. Or perhaps the event you didn’t even realize you’d been waiting for!

Join us for Chatham’s 6th annual celebration of the International Edible Book Festival! Wednesday, March 29th from 4:30-5:30 in the Lobby of the JKM Library.

What’s an edible book, you ask? It’s up to you! It may be food that looks like a book:

Food that was described or consumed by characters in a book:

A fun interpretation of the title of a book:

And whatever else you might think of!

Full details of the event can be found in the Chatham Happenings. Please join us – create your own book to enter for a chance to win one of 5 amazing prizes! Or just come for the free food and to vote for your favorite.

Hope to see you there!

February 23, 2017
by library
0 comments

A Quick Peek into the History of the Minor Bird

Did you know that Chatham’s literary magazine Minor Bird has flown through a few different iterations since it was first hatched in 1929?  Was your interest in the graphics used for the Minor Bird piqued by the new exhibit, Objects of Study: Selections from the Artifact Collections of the Chatham University Archives,  on view at the Women’s Institute?  Did you happen to see a few eye-catching illustrations of Minor Bird covers from the 1950s and 1960s in the JKM Library Newsletter and wonder if there are any more compelling visuals?  Yes?  Then you are in luck!

We, the staff of the Chatham University Archives, selected a handful of our very favorite Minor Bird covers and we’re thrilled to share them with you here.  And, if your appetite for Minor Bird is still not quenched, you can flip through fifteen years’ worth of literary explorations by Chatham students online through the Internet Archive!

The Minor Bird first appeared as a simple, line drawing in 1929.  This logo was used until 1939.

Minor Bird front cover, June 1936

The line drawing also appeared at the top of each page.

Minor Bird, Spring 1929

After a brief stint under the umbrella of the student newspaper, the Minor Bird emerged in 1949 with a very different look.

Minor Bird front cover, Spring 1949

Several variations on the 1949 theme were used, including this Minor Bird cover from 1950.

Minor Bird front cover, Spring 1950

Lots of change happened in the 1950s and the Minor Bird logo was no exception.

Minor Bird front cover, Spring 1951

 

Minor Bird front cover, Spring 1952

 

Minor Bird front cover, January 1955

The Minor Bird covers from the 1960’s are particularly evocative of this expressive era.

Minor Bird front cover, Winter 1967

 

Minor Bird front cover, Spring 1969

 

Minor Bird front cover, Fall 1969

 

Minor Bird rear cover, Fall 1969

The Chatham University Archives include numerous publications by the Chatham community, including additional issues of the Minor Bird, the Sorosis, and Faces & Places.  Stop by the University Archives or contact Molly Tighe, Archivist and Public Services Librarian, for more information.

 

 

February 21, 2017
by library
2 Comments

JKM Library Resources on Black Panther Party

Wasn’t Khalid Raheem’s Black History Month Lunch & Learn lecture today so thought-provoking?  Did it make you curious about some of the books, events, individuals, and organizations that played a role in the history of the Black Panther party?  It made us curious and we’re pleased to let you know that many of the topics discussed can be investigated further at the JKM Library.

For one, the JKM Library has available for check-out the George Jackson book, Soledad Brother: The Prison Letters of George Jackson.  Mr. Raheem’s description of Mr. Jackson’s role in the Revolutionary Prison movement was compelling and this primary source resource provides a direct view of the activist’s experiences.  Click here to find the book in the JKM Library catalog.

Huey Newton, whom Mr. Raheem discussed in relation to the effect of imprisonment had on the eventual splintering of the Black Panther Party, is also well represented in the JKM Library collection.  Click here to listen in on Huey Newton’s conversation with Erik Erikson. There are many more volumes in the JKM collections that discuss the history and legacy of the Black Panther Party and the JKM Library staff are always happy to help you find even more resources in our collections.

In fact, we were thrilled to hear Mr. Raheem discuss the Black Panther Party in Pittsburgh and in Philadelphia because we have a brand, new resource that makes Pennsylvania history research even easier!  To search through online databases of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (from 1786 – 1985) and the Philadelphia Enquirer (from 1860 – 2001), just click “P” on the Databases A-Z tab and select the newspaper of your choice.  From here, you can find lots of articles about the history of the Black Panther Party in our region.

We’re only scratching the surface of the resources available in this post, so stop by the JKM Library and let us know if you’d like to dig a little deeper.  We’re always happy to help!

Thanks to the Office of Student Affairs for bringing to Chatham such a compelling speaker and social activist!

 

 

December 5, 2016
by library
0 comments

Objects of Study: Selections from the Artifact Collections at the Chatham University Archives on view at the Women’s Institute

Have you ever wondered what kind of stuff we keep in the University Archives?  Been curious if there is anything other than letters, photos, and newspapers being saved as part of the record of the university?  Now is your chance to find out!  A new exhibit, Objects of Study: Selections from the Artifact Collections at the Chatham University Archives, is on view in the lounge of the Women’s Institute. Stop by the exhibit to explore the role played by artifacts and objects in documenting the history of the university and to discover some truly remarkable stories about campus, Chatham alums, and more.

One of our favorite items on view is a copper coffer that was retrieved from the cornerstone of the old Dilworth Hall when it was demolished in 1953.  “Dilworth Hall demolished? But, what’s that building just up the hill from the Carriage House?” you might ask.  That’s actually Dilworth Hall II!  The first Dilworth Hall, Dilworth Hall I, was attached to Berry Hall I.  Here’s a picture of both halls as they appeared in a 1906 issue of Sorosis, the student magazine of the day:

View of Dilworth Hall I and Berry Hall I at PCW in 1906

View of Dilworth Hall I and Berry Hall I at PCW in 1906

Both Dilworth Hall I and Berry Hall I were demolished in 1953 to make way for the upgraded academic buildings we still use today: Braun, Falk, and Coolidge.  Here’s a couple photos of the demolition:

View of Demolition of Berry Hall I and Dilworth Hall I at PCW in 1953

View of Demolition of Berry Hall I and Dilworth Hall I at PCW in 1953

View of Berry Hall I and Dilworth Hall I during demolition with Chapel steeple visible in background

View of Berry Hall I and Dilworth Hall I during demolition with Chapel steeple visible in background

I bet you are wondering what was found inside the copper coffer, right?  Check out this article from The Pittsburgh Press (another relic from a bygone era) and read about the discovery.

Newspaper clipping about PCW time capsule discovery

Newspaper clipping about PCW time capsule discovery

The exhibit, Objects of Study: Selections from the Artifact Collections at the Chatham University Archives , features little known bits of history about Berry Hall I, The Minor Bird, and campus dining.

Intrigued?  Here’s some pics to help wet your whistle:

Alumnae Napkin Rings at from University Archives

Alumnae Napkin Rings at from University Archives

History of The Minor Bird Logo

History of The Minor Bird Logo

Check out the copper coffer and other relics from the history of our university in the Women’s Institute or stop by the University Archives in the JKM Library to further explore our history.

October 31, 2016
by library
0 comments

Meet JK Mellon, Bookdrop Monster!

14666051_10153768195167084_7287729226844950656_nMeet Chatham’s newest monster friend, JK Mellon! Born at the Eden Hall campus, JK now lives a happy life at the library, where it feeds on returned library items. Library Access Services Aides, Cheyenne, Delenn, and Sophie, created this lovable creature in celebration of the autumn and Halloween season. Come stop by and see JK Mellon for yourself, take your picture with it, feed it the library items you need to return, and give us any suggestions about future decorations!

October 3, 2016
by library
0 comments

Mountain Day

mountainday2

Olive U. Keck (’24, far left) and four friends pose in front of an automobile on Mountain Day 1923. The festivities took place at the Allen Farm in the Brookside Farms development of Upper St. Clair, southwest of Pittsburgh.

First held in October of 1921, Mountain Day was an annual holiday sponsored by the Athletic Association that gave students and faculty an opportunity to enjoy sports, games, and a picnic outside of the city.

The event was described as follows in the October 23, 1923 edition of The Arrow, the college newspaper: “It was a clear, cold day, and everyone there was in fine spirits. As soon as the picnickers reached the orchard, games of prisoners base, baseball and leap frog were started, and lasted amid much merriment, until lunch time. Lunch was served cafeteria style, and large quantities of wieners, sandwiches, pickles, gingerbread, and all the things that go with a picnic, were consumed by the hungry mob. After lunch a field meet was held, the events were carried off in a most business like manner, under the direction of Marian Frank [‘25]. A standing broad grin, discus throw (a paper plate serving as the discus), a three legged race, blind race and a shoe race, and a tug of war made up the list of events. The tug of war was brought to an untimely end when the rope broke. The Juniors won the meet and received a silver cup, (from Woolworths) with a blue ribbon triumphantly floating from the handle. The Sophomores received a dumbbell from the Gym, as a token of the fifth place in the event. Then came the event of the day—the Hare and Hounds chase. The Seniors and the Sophomores were the Hares, and proved most elusive; as the Hounds, Juniors and Freshman, had great difficulty in tracking them. After the weary racers had collected their belongings, they started for the car, feeling that Mountain Day was one of the college’s pleasantest traditions, and a most successful holiday for everyone.”

The last Mountain Day was held at PCW in the 1950s, but similar events continued to take place at college campuses throughout the country, including women’s colleges Smith and Mount Holyoke.

On Mountain Day 1923, students enjoy lunch on the Allen Farm in the Brookside Farms development of Upper St. Clair.

On Mountain Day 1923, students enjoy lunch on the Allen Farm in the Brookside Farms development of Upper St. Clair.

August 31, 2016
by library
0 comments

The 24/7 Lab – An Always-Open Study Space

If you need a place to study late at night after the Library closes, or if you need to print out your paper after finishing it at 2:00 AM, check out our 24/7 Lab!

24/7 Lab

24/7 Lab

The 24/7 Lab is a computer lab which is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.  It can be accessed via a door in the glass vestibule which can be opened using your student ID!

Entrance to the 24/7 Lab

Entrance to the 24/7 Lab

 

After the library closes at midnight (or at 7 PM on Fridays and Saturdays), the 24/7 Lab is extended from the one computer lab room to include Room 103, LCC1, and the large Library lab. This provides a variety of open tables and computer access as well as group study and individual spaces.

Room 103

Room 103

 

LCC1

LCC1

 

Library Lab 101

Library Lab 101

 

The nearest bathrooms to the 24/7 Lab are located in the Eddy Theater Lobby.  For your comfort and convenience, the Eddy Theater Lobby will be open. The Eddy doors nearest the Library will remain unlocked as well as the wheelchair accessible entrance on the other side of the building.

Eddy Theater Lobby Entrance

Eddy Theater Lobby Entrance

We hope that the 24/7 Lab proves to be useful to you!  Happy studying and be brilliant!

Skip to toolbar