June 1, 2017
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Chatham Summers with the University Archives on View a the JKM

The JKM Library and the Archives & Special Collections are pleased to present Chatham Summers with the University Archives, a media exhibition highlighting the rich documentation in our photographic collections.  Items on view document life at Chatham during the summer and feature images of campus sports, events, and more.

Lantern Slide Depicting PCW Tennis, c. 1905

The exhibit includes visual material from Chatham’s earliest years and from more recent years.

1888 Sketch of Students Wearing Sun Protection

Though things may seem a bit quieter around campus than during the fall and spring semesters, these images reveal that Chatham students have always pursued a wide variety of activities, regardless of the heat, humidity, or era.

We’ve included a few of our favorites in this post, but stop by the JKM Library to view the exhibit in its entirety!

Taking a Spin Around Campus, c. 1952-1953

 

Diving Practice, c. 1950s

 

Chatham vs. Robert Morris, 1980

Not around campus?  Additional records from Chatham history, including yearbooks, newspapers, photographs, and other records are accessible online at the web site for the University Archives & Special Collections (click here).  Or, stop by the Archives Reading Room to learn more about Chatham history.

October 31, 2016
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Meet JK Mellon, Bookdrop Monster!

14666051_10153768195167084_7287729226844950656_nMeet Chatham’s newest monster friend, JK Mellon! Born at the Eden Hall campus, JK now lives a happy life at the library, where it feeds on returned library items. Library Access Services Aides, Cheyenne, Delenn, and Sophie, created this lovable creature in celebration of the autumn and Halloween season. Come stop by and see JK Mellon for yourself, take your picture with it, feed it the library items you need to return, and give us any suggestions about future decorations!

October 3, 2016
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Mountain Day

mountainday2

Olive U. Keck (’24, far left) and four friends pose in front of an automobile on Mountain Day 1923. The festivities took place at the Allen Farm in the Brookside Farms development of Upper St. Clair, southwest of Pittsburgh.

First held in October of 1921, Mountain Day was an annual holiday sponsored by the Athletic Association that gave students and faculty an opportunity to enjoy sports, games, and a picnic outside of the city.

The event was described as follows in the October 23, 1923 edition of The Arrow, the college newspaper: “It was a clear, cold day, and everyone there was in fine spirits. As soon as the picnickers reached the orchard, games of prisoners base, baseball and leap frog were started, and lasted amid much merriment, until lunch time. Lunch was served cafeteria style, and large quantities of wieners, sandwiches, pickles, gingerbread, and all the things that go with a picnic, were consumed by the hungry mob. After lunch a field meet was held, the events were carried off in a most business like manner, under the direction of Marian Frank [‘25]. A standing broad grin, discus throw (a paper plate serving as the discus), a three legged race, blind race and a shoe race, and a tug of war made up the list of events. The tug of war was brought to an untimely end when the rope broke. The Juniors won the meet and received a silver cup, (from Woolworths) with a blue ribbon triumphantly floating from the handle. The Sophomores received a dumbbell from the Gym, as a token of the fifth place in the event. Then came the event of the day—the Hare and Hounds chase. The Seniors and the Sophomores were the Hares, and proved most elusive; as the Hounds, Juniors and Freshman, had great difficulty in tracking them. After the weary racers had collected their belongings, they started for the car, feeling that Mountain Day was one of the college’s pleasantest traditions, and a most successful holiday for everyone.”

The last Mountain Day was held at PCW in the 1950s, but similar events continued to take place at college campuses throughout the country, including women’s colleges Smith and Mount Holyoke.

On Mountain Day 1923, students enjoy lunch on the Allen Farm in the Brookside Farms development of Upper St. Clair.

On Mountain Day 1923, students enjoy lunch on the Allen Farm in the Brookside Farms development of Upper St. Clair.

April 19, 2016
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Meet the JKM Library Staff: Lyra Bennett

Lyra:lyra

Is a bit of a jigsaw puzzle expert

Is usually planning her next trip abroad to somewhere fascinating

Is 100% on board with having a library cat

What do you do here at The Jennie King Mellon Library?

I’m a part-time Reference Associate.

What made you choose your current profession?

I worked in higher education since graduating from college myself and I love the atmosphere of a college campus!  I’ve also always loved the atmosphere in libraries (thanks to my mom who was a teacher and volunteered at our local library) so when I decided to go to graduate school I chose Library Science.

When you were a child, what did you want to be when you grew up?

An architect!  Then I realized a lot of math was involved so I gave that idea up – but I do still love looking at houses and I still have many of the floor plans (likely completely unrealistic) that I dreamed up as a kid.

What’s your favorite part of your job?

Helping people realize all the great resources (for work, school, and for fun) that the library has.

If you could do one thing to change/improve the JKM Library- with no worries about time or expense, what would you do?

I am 100% on board with having a library cat.  Also, I think it’s a great idea to have a jigsaw puzzle out for people to work on when they need a break from studying!

What do you like to do on your days off?

I like taking a run outside on a nice day or fitting in some yoga if I have time.  I’m also taking French classes now and I actually enjoy doing the homework because it’s something I’m doing just for fun.  I love reading (obviously), baking (and eating), and hiking.  I also love to travel so I’m usually planning a trip (that may or may not happen).

What’s the last thing you checked out? (Brief reviews are appreciated)

I’m almost always reading more than two books at a time – two I recently finished are Mosquitoland by David Arnold (great!) and Ways to Disappear by Idra Novey (the main character is from Pittsburgh – Shadyside is mentioned once or twice) and I also check out a lot of French language movies – the last one I watched was Ernest & Celestine (lovely and cute).

What book do you think everyone should read? Why?

This is a hard question!!  But the first thing that comes to mind is Sweetland by Michael Crummey.  I read this book more than a year ago and I still think about it and it’s characters regularly.  Some characters just stick with you, as if they were real people you knew.  But I just thought of something else I’d recommend too – anything by James Michener.  He writes long sagas based around a specific geographic region.  Some might find his books a little dry and boring but I love them – my favorite is Chesapeake.  When I finish one of his books I feel like I intimately know a place and its history even if I’ve never been there (ahem … Hawaii).

Some of our student workers update the popular reading display and are always looking for recommendations. If you could please list 5 or so of your favorite books that JKM has, that would be great!

I don’t know that many of these could be termed “popular reading” but:

Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides,

Living Poor by Moritz Thomsen (one of my favorite Peace Corps-related memoirs – I’ve read almost every Peace Corps memoir that I know of so I can always give more recommendations on this or memoirs in general – my favorite genre!)

The Cider House Rules or The Hotel New Hampshire by John Irving

something by Willa Cather (like Shadows on the Rock, O Pioneers!, or My Antonia)

something by Bill Bryson (like the Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid)

What’s your favorite thing about living in Pittsburgh?

The landscape, hills, rivers – and the neighborhoods.

What’s one thing you think everyone should do while they live in the city? (This includes restaurant recommendations, of course)

Walk through Allegheny Cemetery.

Tell us some surprising things about yourself (2/3 would be great):

I am a bit of a jigsaw puzzle expert.

I love clothes and fashion but HATE shopping.

I got my nose pierced about 5 years before I got my ears pierced.  In fact, I only got my ears pierced because my friends thought it was weird that my nose was pierced but not my ears and took me to get them done!

March 3, 2016
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Celebrating Women’s History: Chatham Women and Politics

In celebration of Women’s History Month, the University Archives presents selections from our collection that highlight Chatham’s unwavering commitment to encouraging civic engagement in all levels of the political system.

This exhibition, Celebrating Women’s History: Chatham Women in Politics, demonstrates student civic engagement tracing back to the earliest days of the Suffragette movement, when students paraded through downtown Pittsburgh in support of women’s right to vote.

Pennsylvania College for Women float in support of women's right to vote, 1914

Pennsylvania College for Women float in support of women’s right to vote, 1914

Materials on exhibit illustrate a wide variety of activities, including rallies supporting equal access to education and student involvement in all levels of the political process.  The exhibit illustrates the continuity of the civic engagement among the student body and the university’s unwavering commitment to foster civic engagement as a core value.

We welcome you to explore Celebrating Women’s History: Chatham Women in Politics at the JKM Library and in the lounge of the Women’s Institute.  See below for some of our favorite archival records on this topic, plus a few that we just couldn’t squeeze into the display cases! Still hungry for more Chatham history?  Click here for more information about the collections in the Chatham University Archives & Special Collections.  

Clippings documenting Chatham's "Women and the War" Conference

Clippings documenting Chatham’s “Women and the War” Conference

During World War II, Chatham hosted an conference titled, “Women and the War” to discuss the role of women in the war effort.

Student volunteers update a poster showing the contributions of Faculty, Seniors, Juniors, Sophomores, and Freshmen to the Fund to fight war and communism.

Student volunteers update a poster showing the contributions of Faculty, Seniors, Juniors, Sophomores, and Freshmen to the Fund to fight war and communism.

Chatham students worked tirelessly to support the war effort, both at home and on the front lines.

World War II veterans return to campus to continue their studies.

World War II veterans return to campus to continue their studies.

In the 1950s, Chatham students turned their attention to increasing voter turnout, both on campus and within the broader community.

Students from Harrisburg cast their absentee ballots.

Students from Harrisburg cast their absentee ballots.

Student-lead efforts to increase voter turnout continue to this day.  In 1997, Chatham students collaborated with students from the University of Pittsburgh in a program to increase voter registration in the local community.

Two-page spread from the 1997 Cornerstone about voter registration efforts.

Two-page spread from the 1997 Cornerstone about voter registration efforts.

In the 1960s, Chatham women joined in the rising chorus of American students speaking out on issues of civil rights and the war in Vietnam.  After the Greensburg Four protested racial segregation at a Woolworth’s lunch counter in North Carolina, students from all over the south joined the sit-in.  In Pittsburgh, Chatham students protested outside the downtown Pittsburgh Woolworth, carrying signs reading “Chatham students protest civil rights violation,” and “Chatham students protest Woolworth lunch counter segregation.”  Click here to view a picture of this protest captured by legendary Pittsburgh photographer Teenie Harris housed at the Carnegie Museum of Art. 

Read more about the 1960 protest in this clipping from the Chatham student newspaper.

Woolworths

Article appearing in “The Arrow” on April 8, 1960 about Chatham student protest of lunch counter segregation

All across the country, college students voiced concerns about equality, civil liberties, and civil rights.  The university hosted a conference focusing on campus unrest in 1968, allowing college and university presidents, faculty, students and administrators to discuss and understand the changing political climate.

Brochure for conference on campus unrest held at Chatham in 1968

Brochure for conference on campus unrest held at Chatham in 1968

As the 1970s drew near, Chatham students became very engaged in discussion of the Vietnam War and continued to the support civil rights issues.

Chatham students protest the Vietnam War on Fifth Avenue

Chatham students protest the Vietnam War on Fifth Avenue

Chatham rally about Attica Prison riots

Chatham rally about Attica Prison riots

Material from Strike Information Central demonstrating student unrest

Material from Strike Information Central demonstrating student unrest

Editorial appearing in Chatham's "The Arrow" in 1970

Editorial appearing in Chatham’s “The Arrow” in 1970

Student civic engagement continued through the 1980s, when Chatham women participated in demonstrations in Pittsburgh and Washington, D.C.  One student attended a meeting at the White House with student leaders and President Jimmy Carter.

Bonnie McElvery, Student Government President, with President Jimmy Carter at the White House

Bonnie McElvery, Student Government President, with President Jimmy Carter at the White House

 

Chatham students at a Pro-Choice rally in Washinton, D.C. in 1989

Chatham students at a Pro-Choice rally in Washinton, D.C. in 1989

In 1995, Chatham students organized a rally in support of Vice President Al Gore’s campaign to preserve federal funding for student loans.  The rally was attended by over 2500 students from local colleges and universities and at least one University President.  Can you spot the University President in the pictures from the event below?

Images from 1995 rally to preserve federal funding for student loans

Images from 1995 rally to preserve federal funding for student loans

Over the years, Chatham has invited activists, heads of state, members of Congress, and other office holders to engage with students on local, national, and international political issues.

Fliers for some of Chatham's visiting speakers

Fliers for some of Chatham’s visiting speakers

Curious about Patricia Schroeder?  Here’s more information about her career and her visit to Chatham.

Brochure from Patricia Schroeder visit to Chatham in 2004

Brochure from Patricia Schroeder visit to Chatham in 2004

Wondering if Catherine Baker Knoll, who spoke at Chatham as the Treasurer for Pennsylvania, held any other public office in the years that followed?  Her records are open for research at the Detre Library and Archives at the Heinz History Center in downtown Pittsburgh.  Click here for the finding aid to her papers.  Remember, the Chatham University Archives can help you locate primary source records at other archival repositories.

Of course, we’re all looking forward to the 2016 commencement speaker, Chatham’s own Muriel Bowser.  Muriel Bowser graduated from Chatham in 1994 and was the eighth Mayor of Washington, D.C.

Chatham Alumna Muriel Bowser

Chatham Alumna Muriel Bowser

As much as we’ve shown through Celebrating Women’s History: Chatham Women in Politics, we have so much more material in the University Archives that documents Chatham’s unwavering commitment to encouraging civic engagement among students.  We’d be thrilled to show you more from our collections on this or any other area of Chatham history.  For more information about our collections and how to contact us, click here.

August 5, 2015
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Library (and 24/7 space) CLOSED Monday August 10

The JKM Library, including the 24/7 study space, will be closed all day this Monday, August 10 due to a planned power outage.

Reference Librarians will be available to assist you with all your library and research needs during the hours of 8am to 10pm. To contact a librarian:

  • IM us at JennieRef, or use the chat box on our website.
  • Text us at (724) 919-4645
  • Email us at jkmref@chatham.edu

To contact a specific librarian, use the following email addresses:

Please note that this power outage includes most campus classroom buildings and all computer labs. We have checked with IT, and it is extremely unlikely that any lab space or printers will be available for student use on Monday. If you need computer or printer access, please make sure to do so off-campus or get everything done the day before.

October 1, 2014
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LGBT History Month

The JKM Library is commemorating LGBT History Month during October with a book display of items from the collection. Come into the library to check out one of these great titles on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender history and culture. Popular and documentary films are also available.

Check out one of these upcoming campus events:

September 24, 2014
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ILLiad Outage Sept 30: 10am-noon

alertILLiad will be down from 10 a.m. to noon this coming Tuesday, Sept. 30th for an upgrade.

During this time, you will be unable to request materials through ILLiad or retrieve ones that have arrived. However, as soon as the upgrade is complete, access will be restored.

If you have any questions, please contact the Reference Desk:

Call: 412-365-1670
Text: 724-919-4645
Email: JKMRef@Chatham.edu

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