March 30, 2020
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Virtual Chatham Archives: A Survey of What’s Online

Since COVID-19 was declared a pandemic by the WHO on March 11th, 2020, life in America has changed significantly. The impact has been felt locally in many ways, with many people working from home and practicing social distancing.  In this environment, the online access provided through the Chatham University Archives becomes an even greater research tool.

The Chatham University Archives has many collections—including many publications created by the university—available to the public on the Web (library.chatham.edu/archives or click here) and we’re happy to share some guidance on searching these materials.

What Do We Have? An Overview:

 

This screenshot shows where you can access the collections on the Archives page – the particular collections I will highlight below are circled in red.

Commencement Programs

  • This collection contains documentation of commencement exercises held at Chatham University between 1870 and the present, including both undergraduate and graduate degree conferral ceremonies (Access the collection here)

Chatham College: The First Ninety Years

  • A book published in 1960 by Chatham history professor and historian Laberta Dysart, detailing Chatham’s history until that point. (Access the collection here)

Yearbooks (1915-2010)

  • This collection contains scanned images of Chatham’s yearbooks from 1915-2010 – a great source of information for campus life and events, as well as information about former Chatham students. (Access the collection here)

Course Catalogs

  • Scanned images and digital archives of course catalogs from 1870-2019 – this would be great for anyone interested in what courses Chatham offered historically. (Access the collections by clicking on the date range you’re looking for: 1870-1991, 2006-2014, 2016-2019)

Alumnae Directories (select volumes)

  • Contact information for Chatham alumnae – a great resource if you’re wanting to find out if someone went to Chatham, but better for genealogical research because the most recent one available online is from 1956. (Access the collection here)

Alumnae Recorder

  • Alumnae newsletters sent out to Chatham alumnae, detailing news from classmates and other pertinent information for Chatham alumnae to know. (Access the collection here)

Minor Bird

Student Handbooks

  • Selected volumes of the handbooks given to students at the start of every school year, detailing rules and regulations. Some of them even have interesting tidbits of Chatham history and folklore, like ghost stories! (Access the collection here)

Student Newspapers

  • Student newspapers dating as far back as the late 1800s. These are a fantastic source of information for not only what was going on at Chatham at the time, but on occasion the greater Pittsburgh area and the world. The newspapers also contain advertisements from local Pittsburgh businesses, enabling a researcher to learn about some historic Pittsburgh businesses. (Access the collection by clicking on the date range you’re looking for: 1895-1903, 1903-1921, 1921-1923, 1923-1934, 1934-1939, 1939-1948, 1949-2018)

The Dilworthian

  • Earlier in Chatham’s history, back when it was Pennsylvania Female College and Pennsylvania College for Women, there was a school called Dilworth Hall that was considered a feeder school for the college. The Dilworthian is their quarterly publication, like a student newspaper, written by their students (who could be considered high school students). (Access the collection here)

How can I access these materials?

All these materials are either held on one of two online platforms, the Internet Archive or Artstor. Coming very soon, we will have video tutorials giving a more detailed overview of how to use each of these. For now, though, here is a helpful tip to get started.

Materials on the Internet Archive are keyword searchable using the search box that has a black background and says “Search inside.” Using the search box with a white background will search all the items in the Internet Archive, rather than the yearbook, course catalog, or student newspaper you selected.

It is also important to think about the terms or keywords to enter into the search box.  A good rule of thumb for the search bar is the mantra “less is more.” For example, rather than searching “sledding on campus,” try “sledding” or “sled.” Keep in mind that search results will be drawn from the text in the volume, not the pictures. So, a picture of students sledding on campus will only be returned from a search for “sled” if there is a caption (or other text) that has the word “sled.”

For searching names, the simplicity principle also applies.  Try searching an individual’s last name, rather than the first and last names together.  This way, the search returns will show listings for “Jane Smith” as well as for “Smith, Jane.”  Also, if you’re looking up a name, make sure you have the correct spelling – the search function shows no mercy for spelling errors!

The above image shows what happens when search results appear. You’ll see the search term that was used in the green circle. The blue arrows (one of which is circled in yellow) show where that term appears in the document. If you hover your cursor over a blue arrow, a box like the one circled in orange will appear – it gives you a slight preview of how the search term is used on that page. When you click on a blue arrow and arrive on the specified page, the search term will also be highlighted in purple – areas where this is present in the image are also highlighted with orange circles.

We hope that this resource overview will help you as you continue to conduct research using the primary source documents. If you have any questions, feel free to use the chat box on the library’s home page to speak to the reference librarian on duty or contact Archivist and Public Services Librarian Molly Tighe directly at mtighe1@chatham.edu.

March 17, 2020
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Our Virtual Services FAQs

We at the JKM Library hope you’re all staying healthy and taking all necessary precautions to keep others healthy too. We know this is a stressful time, but the JKM Library’s librarians are here for you and your research needs! That being said, we are limited in how we can help. See the FAQ below, and if you still have questions, please reach out to us through the Ask a Librarian chat on our homepage or via email at reference@chatham.edu.

  • Can I get into the library building?
    • The library building is closed for the time being.
    • The 24/7 space is now also closed to the public. If you have an [urgent, immediate, pressing] need to access the 24/7 space, please complete the Computer Lab Access Request Form on myChatham -> Documents and Forms -> Residence Life -> JKM Library Computer Lab Access Request Form.
  • Can I access the University Archives?
    • Not physically, but the archives’ digital collections can be accessed on their website (https://library.chatham.edu/archives)!
    • You may also email your archives related questions to Archivist Molly Tighe at m.tighe@chatham.edu
  • Can I use E-ZBorrow and/or ILLiad?
    • E-ZBorrow is no longer available at this time. ILLiad is available but limited. Our team is working on setting up remote functionality, and right now we’re working off of an automated system. To increase your chances of receiving your item, be sure to include the ISSN in your request form. Only digital items will be processed at this time, nothing physical.
  • Can I return my library items?
    • If you are graduating and are done with your items, please return them to the library via the drop box in the library vestibule if you are able. If you are graduating but have already left campus or if you will be returning to campus, you can return them by snail mail or in person once we reopen. If you have a question or concern, please reach out to Head of Access Services Kate Wenger (kwenger@chatham.edu).
  • Will I get fined due to Coronavirus related late items?
    • No. If you have any concerns about library items being overdue, please reach out to Head of Access Services Kate Wenger (kwenger@chatham.edu)
  • Can I schedule a research appointment?
    • Yes! Librarians are available to work with you one-on-one via Zoom. Please email your subject librarian or fill out this form to make an appointment.
  • Can I still do research?
    • Definitely! You have access to about 70 digital databases, almost over 750,000 full text eBooks, and over 85,000 full text eJournals.
    • You can search almost all of our digital content via the “All Resources” tab on our homepage.
    • You can search for our individual full text eJournals and ebooks via the “Search for eJournal Titles” button on the homepage.
    • You can search for individual databases alphabetically via our “Find Databases” button on our homepage.
    • See our Research Guides in your subject area or for things like primary sources and citation information via the “See Resources by Subject” button on our homepage.
  • Can I access physical books, journals, movies, or other items in the library?
    • No, unfortunately no physical items in the library building are available at this time.
  • Can I call the library and talk with a librarian?
    • Not right now, but you can email us or Zoom with us, or use our chat
  • Can I chat quickly with a librarian?
    • Absolutely! We will be monitoring our Ask a Librarian chat on our homepage during these hours:
      • 8:00 am – 10:00 pm Monday – Thursday
      • 8:00 am – 5:00 pm Friday
      • 1:00 pm – 7:00 pm Saturday
      • 12:00 pm – 10:00 pm Sunday

We hope this FAQ is helpful and that we can continue to assist you in all your academic endeavors! Please stay up-to-date on library offerings and announcements by checking our social media pages (@jkmlibrary and @chathamarchives on Instagram, library Facebook, archives Facebook) and our website regularly.

March 14, 2020
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JKM Library Moving to Virtual Services Exclusively

JKM Librarians are eager to continue to support faculty, students and staff as we experience the current move to virtual instruction. In keeping with current policy and out of an abundance of caution, librarians will provide remote services only. The library building will be closed for the time being, although at this time 24 hour space is still accessible.

Our Ask a Librarian chat service and Zoom will allow us to continue to provide reference, instruction and consultation services. We will continue to monitor the situation and post information on our home page. https://library.chatham.edu/friendly.php?s=home

We will staff the Ask a Librarian chat service during the following hours:

  • 8:00 am – 10:00 pm Monday – Thursday
  • 8:00 am – 5:00 pm Friday
  • 1:00 pm – 7:00 pm Saturday
  • 12:00 pm – 10:00 pm Sunday

Access our Ask a Librarian chat service on our home page: https://library.chatham.edu/friendly.php?s=home

The Archives and Special Collections will provide remote reference through email.

We have hundreds of thousands of eBooks, journals, and videos available in our databases and searchable from our home page. We can help you locate material that could perhaps substitute for print resources.

Librarians are available for consultations about classes and student support and can be reached by email (jkmref@chatham.edu) or by chat (Ask a Librarian)

We can provide instruction via Zoom.

If you have any items checked out, we suggest you hold on to them – due dates are flexible.

 

Take care and stay well,

Jill Ausel, Library Director

November 12, 2019
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Joy Harjo: 23rd Poet Laureate of the United States

Crazy Brave by Joy Harjo

On June 19, 2019, Joy Harjo, member of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, was announced as the 23rd Poet Laureate of the United States. She is the first Native American to be honored with this title. Harjo is a celebrated author, poet, teacher, activist and musician. She has been awarded multiple high-profile honors and awards in addition to Poet Laureate, including (but not limited to) the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Native Writers Circle of the Americas, the Josephine Miles Poetry Award, the Wallace Stevens Award from the Academy of American Poets, the William Carlos Williams Award from the Poetry Society of America, and the American Indian Distinguished Achievement in the Arts Award.

She has received fellowships from the Arizona Commission on the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Rasmuson Foundation, the Witter Bynner Foundation, and the Ruth Lilly Prize in Poetry. Her memoir, Crazy Brave, was awarded both the PEN USA Literary Award in Creative Nonfiction and the American Book Award.

Harjo has written nine books of poetry, a memoir, two award-winning children’s books, several screenplays, three plays, and a number of prose interviews. Harjo often centers native storytelling, histories, myths, symbols, and values. She also focuses on autobiographical, feminist, and social justice themes throughout her writing.

“I feel strongly that I have a responsibility to all the sources that I am: to all past and future ancestors, to my home country, to all places that I touch down on and that are myself, to all voices, all women, all of my tribe, all people, all earth, and beyond that to all beginnings and endings. In a strange kind of sense [writing] frees me to believe in myself, to be able to speak, to have voice, because I have to; it is my survival.” (The Poetry Foundation)

Service is important to Harjo in practice as well as in her art. She is the director of For Girls Becoming, an organization focused on arts mentorship for young Muscogee women. She is also is a founding board member of the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation.

Harjo does not restrict her creativity and art to writing. She is also an accomplished saxophonist, flutist, and vocalist and has released a handful of award-winning albums. Like her writing, her music draws from her native roots and collaborates with other native musicians. She tours regularly with her band, Arrow Dynamics.

Read more about Poet Laureate of the United States Joy Harjo on the Poetry Foundation’s website and on her own website. You can check out a number of her works through the JKM Library. We recommend beginning with her acclaimed collection She Had Some Horses. Browse here!

February 6, 2019
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The Wray and Olkes Book Collections at the JKM LIbrary

Have you ever checked out a book and noticed it was marked with a sticker that says, “Wray”? Or what about that collection of books on the small bookshelf near the elevator on the third floor marked “Olkes Collection”? Have you ever wondered what Wray and Olkes mean?

The JKM Library has, in addition to our main circulating collection, smaller collections of books that are focused on certain topics, aimed at certain age ranges, or were donated by certain people. We give these collections of books different names in order to honor the person who donated the items or to make it clear that there is something special about the items in the collection. For example, our Curriculum Collection is comprised of books for young readers and includes picture books, middle-grade fiction and nonfiction, young adult fiction and nonfiction, and graphic novels appropriate for those age ranges. In the case of the Wray and Olkes collections, these are items donated by Professor Wendell Wray and Dr. Cheryl Olkes respectively.

Wendell Wray, a library and information science professor emeritus at the University of Pittsburgh, was an avid book collector. The first African-American man to graduate from the then Carnegie Institute of Technology’s library science program with a master’s degree in 1952, Wray was an influential voice in the library profession. After graduation, he went on to be one of the first African-American men to be hired by the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh.

Raised in Beltzhoover, Wray’s resume includes military service during WWII and working at the New York Public Library, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and the inner city outreach program the North Manhattan Library Project. Wray returned to Pittsburgh in 1973 to take a position as a faculty member at the University of Pittsburgh in the library school. He was honored the same year with the Distinguished Alumni award from Carnegie Tech. He moved to California in 1988 upon his retirement, where he spent the rest of his life until his death in 2003.

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October 10, 2018
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The Year of Ireland Book Display

Every year, the JKM Library creates displays of books and resources related to the country selected as the Global Focus country for that academic year. This year, Chatham has selected Ireland! The Year of Ireland display highlights books written by notable Irish authors or written about Ireland’s history, culture, politics, etc. The intention is to make resources available to the Chatham community so you may further educate yourselves on the country of focus selected by the university.

The display can be found on the first floor of the library in the lobby area next to the New Books display. All the materials on the Year of Ireland display are available to be checked out with your Chatham ID card. Wondering if we have a specific book that you don’t see on display? Ask a librarian! We can check our catalog for any materials you’re looking for.

Some items on display include the following. To browse more, click here!

  • Dublin: The Making of a Capital City by David Dickson
  • The Gathering by Anne Enright
  • The Great Hunger: Ireland 1845-1849 by Cecil Woodham Smith
  • Ireland’s Pirate Queen: The True Story of Grace O’Malley by Anne Chambers
  • Time and Tide by Edna O’Brien
  • Women and Politics in Contemporary Ireland: From the Margins to the Mainstream by Yvonne Galligan
  • Stories by Elizabeth Bowen
  • The Princeton History of Modern Ireland edited by Richard Bourke & Ian McBride
  • At Swim-Two-Birds by Flann O’Brien
  • The Course of Irish History edited by T.W. Moody and F.X. Martin
  • The Dancers Dancing by Eilís Ní Dhuibhne
  • Death and Nightingales: A Novel by Eugene McCabe
  • Ireland in Prehistory by Michael Herity and George Eogan

September 5, 2018
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Wednesdays Are a Good Day to Read About Food!

JKM Library’s newspaper collection in the basement.

Are you a foodie? Wednesdays are a good day to read about food, especially in the basement of the JKM Library. That’s where we keep our daily newspapers. Yes, we do continue to receive three national dailies here at the JKM Library (the New York Times, Wall Street Journal our beloved Pittsburgh Post-Gazette). But Wednesdays are special: the NY Times, as well as our Post-Gazette, have a weekly special “Food Sections” – each dealing with far ranging issues – from global agribusiness to weed-pie recipes. Of course, you can read any of this online, but if you want to sit a spell, relax, and eat your scone while reading and licking your fingers to turn the pages of living history, come on down to the ground floor of the Library to see what we have in store!

 

August 29, 2018
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Textbooks in the Library!

For the first time ever, the library is able to offer limited textbooks for checkout! We understand how expensive textbooks can be, which is why we have embraced an idea brought to us by members of the Chatham Student Government. We now accept student textbook donations for our circulating collection. What does this mean? Well, it means that you as a student can check out any of the textbooks we have in our limited collection for a full semester to use for classwork. You can browse the textbook collection on the third floor next to our Olkes collection. You can find them on the shelf to the right as you walk out of the elevator. If you find a book you think will be helpful, you can check it out at the Circulation Desk downstairs on the first floor.

Because these textbooks were donations from your peers, they might not be the most recent editions. This also means that our selection is still small since we rely on you for textbook donations. So what if you want to donate your old textbooks? First of all, thank you! You’re helping your fellow students decrease the cost of their education. In order to donate your textbooks to the library, bring them to either the Reference or Circulation Desk on the first floor.


Faculty are also encouraged to donate materials and make use of our Course Reserve service by putting materials (such as books, DVDs, or articles) on reserve in the library for your students to access. You can learn more about Course Reserve here.

We know that there will still be books for class that you won’t be able to find in our library, but don’t worry! You can still check E-ZBorrow or ILLiad to see if another library has what you need. If you have any questions about our textbook collection or how to find books for class, please contact a librarian! We’re available through email, phone, chat, text, and in person at the Reference Desk, and we’re always happy to help!

August 13, 2018
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Book Recommendation: Belief Is Its Own Kind of Truth, Maybe

 

Image taken from Amazon

Lori Jakiela opens her memoir with a line as humble as the title, describing her memoir “primarily a work of nonfiction.” What follows is a dramatic account of Jakiela’s search to make contact with her biological family after the death of her adoptive parents. Belief Is Its Own Kind of Truth, Maybe is an evocative story of one woman’s yearning for closure, love, and family.

The presentation of these ideals are developed through Jakiela’s description of loss. She articulates her pain in ways that are acute, poignant, familiar. Her pages are decorated with mediations on a particular grief—the kind of unique sorrow that stems from her identity as an adoptee. Through her attempts to contact her native family, for example, she continues, with insistence, to refer to her adoptive family as her “real” family.

Some craft elements will engage readers from the start. Jakiela, a native Pittsburgher, describes a setting that Chatham students will find pleasantly relatable. More uniquely, Jakiela subtly challenges storytelling conventions through experimental use of dialogue. She presents uninterrupted, staccato quotes and repetitive dialogue tags, both of which reveal a one-of-a-kind style—clever and intentional in its pacing.

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March 12, 2018
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Placing Holds on JKM Library Items

Ever found a great JKM library book while doing research from your dorm, office, or home? Wish you could have placed a hold on that item so you could pick it up later?

Well now you can!

Look for a link to “Place hold” when searching our library catalog via the Books+ tab on our website. When you are prompted to login, enter your Chatham username and password, and then you’ll be able to place a hold for the item. We will pull it from the shelves and hold it for you for 14 days.

Please be aware that if someone else finds the item on the shelf before we have a chance to pull it for you, they will be allowed to check it out.

Lastly, for items that are checked out or missing, use E-ZBorrow (for books) or ILLiad (for books not available in E-ZBorrow, as well as DVDs and CDs) to order them from other libraries instead of placing a hold. You’ll get them much faster that way.

Any questions? Ask a librarian!

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