February 23, 2017
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A Quick Peek into the History of the Minor Bird

Did you know that Chatham’s literary magazine Minor Bird has flown through a few different iterations since it was first hatched in 1929?  Was your interest in the graphics used for the Minor Bird piqued by the new exhibit, Objects of Study: Selections from the Artifact Collections of the Chatham University Archives,  on view at the Women’s Institute?  Did you happen to see a few eye-catching illustrations of Minor Bird covers from the 1950s and 1960s in the JKM Library Newsletter and wonder if there are any more compelling visuals?  Yes?  Then you are in luck!

We, the staff of the Chatham University Archives, selected a handful of our very favorite Minor Bird covers and we’re thrilled to share them with you here.  And, if your appetite for Minor Bird is still not quenched, you can flip through fifteen years’ worth of literary explorations by Chatham students online through the Internet Archive!

The Minor Bird first appeared as a simple, line drawing in 1929.  This logo was used until 1939.

Minor Bird front cover, June 1936

The line drawing also appeared at the top of each page.

Minor Bird, Spring 1929

After a brief stint under the umbrella of the student newspaper, the Minor Bird emerged in 1949 with a very different look.

Minor Bird front cover, Spring 1949

Several variations on the 1949 theme were used, including this Minor Bird cover from 1950.

Minor Bird front cover, Spring 1950

Lots of change happened in the 1950s and the Minor Bird logo was no exception.

Minor Bird front cover, Spring 1951

 

Minor Bird front cover, Spring 1952

 

Minor Bird front cover, January 1955

The Minor Bird covers from the 1960’s are particularly evocative of this expressive era.

Minor Bird front cover, Winter 1967

 

Minor Bird front cover, Spring 1969

 

Minor Bird front cover, Fall 1969

 

Minor Bird rear cover, Fall 1969

The Chatham University Archives include numerous publications by the Chatham community, including additional issues of the Minor Bird, the Sorosis, and Faces & Places.  Stop by the University Archives or contact Molly Tighe, Archivist and Public Services Librarian, for more information.

 

 

August 31, 2016
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The 24/7 Lab – An Always-Open Study Space

If you need a place to study late at night after the Library closes, or if you need to print out your paper after finishing it at 2:00 AM, check out our 24/7 Lab!

24/7 Lab

24/7 Lab

The 24/7 Lab is a computer lab which is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.  It can be accessed via a door in the glass vestibule which can be opened using your student ID!

Entrance to the 24/7 Lab

Entrance to the 24/7 Lab

 

After the library closes at midnight (or at 7 PM on Fridays and Saturdays), the 24/7 Lab is extended from the one computer lab room to include Room 103, LCC1, and the large Library lab. This provides a variety of open tables and computer access as well as group study and individual spaces.

Room 103

Room 103

 

LCC1

LCC1

 

Library Lab 101

Library Lab 101

 

The nearest bathrooms to the 24/7 Lab are located in the Eddy Theater Lobby.  For your comfort and convenience, the Eddy Theater Lobby will be open. The Eddy doors nearest the Library will remain unlocked as well as the wheelchair accessible entrance on the other side of the building.

Eddy Theater Lobby Entrance

Eddy Theater Lobby Entrance

We hope that the 24/7 Lab proves to be useful to you!  Happy studying and be brilliant!

August 12, 2016
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2016 Summer Reading List

The books of the 2016 Summer Reading List are now on display on the first floor of the Library!!

What is the Summer Reading List? Your friendly Chatham University Librarians have been keeping an eye out for interesting, informative, and exciting books over the past year and thought you might enjoy reading some of these as you start your first year at Chatham. Featuring popular nonfiction, as well as some great literature, this list contains something for everyone!  Find the full 2016 Summer Reading List here!

Some highlights of the List include:

Tattoos: philosophy for everyone: I ink, therefore I am / edited by Robert ArpTattoos: Philosophy for Everyone: I Ink, Therefore I Am by Robert Arp

Body art or eyesore, a celebration of individuality, or at very least a conversation piece, tattoos provide fertile ground for philosophical discussion, raising intriguing questions from aesthetics to feminism, from semiotics to the philosophy of the person.

The evolution of a corporate idealist: when girl meets oil / Christine BaderThe Evolution of a Corporate Idealist: When Girl Meets Oil by Christine Bader

The Evolution of a Corporate Idealist: Girl Meets Oil is based on Bader’s experience with BP and then with a United Nations effort to prevent and address human rights abuses linked to business. Using her story as its skeleton, Bader weaves in the stories of other “Corporate Idealists” working inside some of the world’s biggest and best-known companies.

How to do things with videogames / Ian BogostHow to Do Things with Videogames by Ian Bogost

Until games are understood to have valid applications across the cultural spectrum, their true potential will remain unrealized. How to Do Things with Videogames offers a fresh starting point to more fully consider games’ progress today and promise for the future.

It's easy being green: a handbook for earth-friendly living / Crissy TraskIt’s Easy Being Green: A Handbook for Earth-Friendly Living by Crissy Trask

It’s Easy Being Green is a handy tool to help you make better choices for the environment. This is what the busy person needs to start making changes today. Get informative, comprehensive and practical information for adopting greener buying habits and identifying earth-friendly products; shopping for green products online; participating in online activism; and learning from over 250 eco-tips for cultivating a sustainable environment.

Half a lifelong romance / Eileen Chang ; translated by Karen S. KingsburyHalf a Lifelong Romance by Eileen Chang; translated by Karen S. Kingsbury

Shanghai, 1930s. Shen Shijun, a young engineer, has fallen in love with his colleague, the beautiful Gu Manzhen. He is determined to resist his family’s efforts to match him with his wealthy cousin so that he can marry her. But dark circumstances—a lustful brother-in-law, a treacherous sister, a family secret—force the two young lovers apart…A glamorous, wrenching tale set against the glittering backdrop of an extraordinary city, Half a Lifelong Romance is a beloved classic from one of the essential writers of twentieth-century China.

On writing: a memoir of the craft / by Stephen KingOn Writing: A Memoir of the Craft by Stephen King

Stephen King reflects on how his writing has helped him through difficult times and describes various aspects of the art of writing.

Book of rhymes: the poetics of hip hop / Adam BradleyBook of Rhymes: The Poetics of Hip Hop by Adam Bradley

Examining rap history’s most memorable lyricists and their inimitable techniques, literary scholar Adam Bradley argues that we must understand rap as poetry or miss the vanguard of poetry today. Book of Rhymes explores America’s least understood poets, unpacking their surprisingly complex craft, and according rap poetry the respect it deserves.

A short history of nearly everything / Bill BrysonA Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson

In this book Bill Bryson explores the most intriguing and consequential questions that science seeks to answer and attempts to understand everything that has transpired from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization. To that end, Bill Bryson apprenticed himself to a host of the world’s most profound scientific minds, living and dead.

Crazy: a father's search through America's mental health madness / Pete EarleyCrazy: A Father’s Search through America’s Mental Health Madness by Pete Earley

Former Washington Post reporter Pete Earley had written extensively about the criminal justice system. But it was only when his own son-in the throes of a manic episode-broke into a neighbor’s house that he learned what happens to mentally ill people who break a law. This is the Earley family’s compelling story, a troubling look at bureaucratic apathy and the countless thousands who suffer confinement instead of care, brutal conditions instead of treatment, in the ‘revolving doors’ between hospital and jail.

The quartet: orchestrating the second American Revolution, 1783-1789 / Joseph J. EllisThe Quartet: Orchestrating the Second American Revolution, 1783-1789 by Joseph J. Ellis

From Pulitzer Prize–winning American historian Joseph J. Ellis, the unexpected story of why the thirteen colonies, having just fought off the imposition of a distant centralized governing power, would decide to subordinate themselves anew. In 1776, thirteen American colonies declared themselves independent states that only temporarily joined forces in order to defeat the British. Once victorious, they planned to go their separate ways. The Quartet is the story of the second American founding and of the men most responsible—George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison.

June 9, 2015
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Summer Reading Preview

The summer reading list for first-year Chatham students has been posted! The contents of the list were chosen by your friendly neighborhood librarians, and include entries from different subject areas. There’s something on this list for everyone (and several things that I’ll be adding to my own summer reading list). Here’s a preview of some of the titles; make sure to access the complete list to see some other choices.

 

The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth GapCover: The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap
Matt Taibbi

In the wake of the 2008 financial crisis and the Occupy movement, The Divide focuses on the myriad ways that wealth—or lack thereof—affects the rights afforded to US citizens (as well as the way this system impacts the immigration debate). Mass incarceration, stop-and-frisk, and the contemporary landscape of the US justice system provide evidence for Taibbi’s portrayal of a system that privileges wealth above all else.

 

Cover: Eating Together: Food, Friendship, and InequalityEating Together: Food, Friendship, and Inequality
Alice P. Julier

What is the social impact of shared meals? Julier (director of the Master’s program in Food Studies here at Chatham) writes about the intersection of social eating experiences and social inequality, examining the literal and figurative aspects of who has a seat at the table.

 

 

The Fever: How Malaria Has Ruled Humankind for 500,000 YearsCover: The Fever: How Malaria Has Ruled Humankind for 500,000 Years
Sonia Shah

The Fever addresses malaria as a subject with various historical, scientific, and socio-political resonances. Alongside anecdotal evidence of the way the disease is approached and conceived of in malaria-afflicted areas, Shah takes on the ineffectual attempts of various global organizations to curb its effects. The Fever offers a deeper understanding of the way malaria has shaped and continues to affect human history.

 

Citizen: An American LyricCover: Citizen: An American Lyric
Claudia Rankine

From microaggressions to overt racial violence, Citizen addresses life in “post-race” America. Rankine meditates on the ways that this constant narrative of otherness impacts daily life and, in some cases, even personal safety. Composed of prose poems, verse, essays, and images, Rankine’s work is a form-agnostic witness account of contemporary race and racism in America.

 

The Signal and the Noise: Why So Many Predictions Fail—But Some Don’tCover: The Signal and the Noise: Why So Many Predictions Fail—But Some Don’t
Nate Silver

Silver takes on the art and science of forecasting, analyzing the various reasons—from a mastery of statistics to a healthy understanding of uncertainty—why some predictions are successful while others are not. The Signal and the Noise investigates forecasting from multiple vantage points, using examples of correct and incorrect predictions from sports, politics, economics, and more.

 

Source: Music of the Avant-garde, 1966-1973
Edited by Larry Austin and Douglas Kahn

Cover: Source: Music of the Avant-garde, 1966-1973This volume reproduces issues of the avant-garde periodical Source, which published a variety of experimental music bits and pieces. Introductory material provides some historical context, followed by the downright weirdness of the content itself, with pieces from John Cage, Morton Feldman, Steve Reich, Nam June Paik, Harry Partch, and others.

 

 

The Paris of Appalachia: Pittsburgh in the Twenty-First CenturyCover: The Paris of Appalachia: Pittsburgh in the Twenty-First Century
Brian O’Neill

An affectionate tribute to Pittsburgh that also deals some tough love in response to some of the city’s ongoing problems. O’Neill includes the stories of Pittsburgh natives in his analysis, attempting to capture the character of a city situated somewhere between the East Coast and the Midwest both in terms of physical location and regional character.

May 14, 2015
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UPDATED: May 18 Upgrade = Off-Campus Access to Library Resources Restored

alertUpdate 5/18/2015 2:10pm: The upgrade is complete, and off-campus access to library databases is now working. If you have any difficulties, please do not hesitate to contact us by phone: 412-365-1670, by email: jkmref@chatham.edu, or by IMing us on our website here: http://library.chatham.edu/.


 

On Monday, May 18th, we will be upgrading EZproxy, which is the tool that allows you to access our library databases from off-campus. This will mean that access to the databases from off-campus will be spotty at best and possibly down all day.

If you normally have to log-in using your Chatham username and password while on-campus (this often happens for computers connecting to the wireless, as well as the occasional desktop computer), that access will be affected as well.

We hope to have the upgrade completed in as timely a manner as possible. Thank you in advance for your patience.

July 1, 2014
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Having trouble accessing your favorite database?

interrobangsmallHi there! So today was the big switch from Ovid to EBSCO for the following databases:

  • EBM Reviews (renamed Cochrane Collection)
  • Medline
  • PsycINFO (including PsycArticles)
  • SocINDEX (replaced Social Work Abstracts)

 

As we work to update our links to these databases on the Library website, here’s a (relatively) easy way to access these databases.

 

  1. From JKM’s homepage, click Databases A-Z underneath the search toolbar
  2. Click the link for “Academic Search Premier” (It’s the first one-can’t miss it!)
  3. Above the EBSCOHost search bar, click the “Choose Databases” link (Pictured)asp
  4. Un-select Academic Search Premier and choose the database(s) that you’d like to search
  5. Tah-dah!

 

Soon enough, you’ll be able to search through your chosen database(s).

Thank you for your patience, and best of luck with your research!

June 10, 2014
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Moving to EBSCO: PsycINFO, Medline, etc

alertOn July 1st or shortly after, the following library databases will move from the Ovid platform to EBSCO:

  • EBM Reviews (will be renamed Cochrane Collection)
  • Medline
  • PsycINFO (including PsycArticles)
  • PsycTests
  • SocINDEX (replaces Social Work Abstracts)

If you have any saved search histories, projects, articles, alerts, etc within Ovid, you will no longer have access to those as of July 1. You will want to take a screen shot of this information so that you can replicate it within the relevant EBSCO database. If you would like assistance with this, please ask a librarian using the following options:

June 8, 2014
by library
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America: History and Life, June’s Database of the Month

Ever wanted to do any research about anything that involves the United States and Canada? If so, you ought to know about  EBSCOHost’s America: History and Life.

The portraits of Daniel Shays and Job Shattuck, leaders of Shay’s Rebellion. This rebellion was in response to economic trouble of the 1780s and is seen as a potential cause of the replacement of the Articles of Confederation with the United States Constitution.

Attention students and faculty in: African American Studies, Art History, Cultural Studies, Economics, Education, Environmental Science, Environmental Studies, Global Policy Studies, History, International Studies, Law & Society, Media Arts, Policy Studies, Political Science, Public Policy Studies, Social Services Administration,Women’s Studies

AND MORE (I’m sure I’m missing at something)

America: History and Life bills itself as “The Definitive Database for the Past and Present of The United States and Canada”. With full-text coverage of over 260 journals and 80 books, indexing and abstracting of thousands of additional titles- including english abstracts of foreign-language articles, book review, and detailed, searchable reference, you gotta admit they have a point.

The database will look very familiar to those who have used EBSCOHost databases in the past. A nice feature of EBSCOHost is that you can search multiple databases simultaneously. Depending on what you are searching for, America: History and Life would likely pair nicely with many other databases, including Academic Search Premier, Communication & Mass Media Complete, Environment Complete, Military & Government Collection, Newspaper Source, and World History Collection.

Canadian Women wearing plastic face protection from snowstorms in Montreal, 1939. While this image is of little historical significance to Canada, it sure looks cool.

Once you’ve selected the databases you want to search, I would go straight to the advanced search feature, where you can find material by Title, author, subject, or look for phrases within the abstract or the full text. Another wonderful feature of America: History and Life is the many ways to you can limit your search. A simple click, and you can make sure that everything your search returns is the full article or book. It’s just as easy to limit your search by publication year, type of material, (A book versus an article versus a book review, for example) make sure your results are peer-reviewed, or look for publications that include images or graphs.

One thing about America: History and Life that disappoints this reviewer is a lack of primary sources. The database focuses on scholarly material of the late 20th century. While it’s great to know your strengths, even especially if you are a database- the researcher should keep in mind that resources you will find in America: History and Life are most likely secondary or tertiary, and will work best when combined with primary resources. Some places to look for great primary resources include:

The Chatham University Archives

Accessible Archives

The National Archives

The Library of Congress American Memory Project

EBSCOHost’s Newspaper Source

Fordham University Modern History Full Text Resources

 

Articles of (potential) interest from America:History and Life

Quigel, James P. “Steel and Steelworkers: Race and Class Struggle in Twentieth-Century Pittsburgh (Book).” Journal Of American History 90, no. 2 (September 2003): 729-731.

Smith, Michael B. 2001. “‘SILENCE, MISS CARSON!’ SCIENCE, GENDER, AND THE RECEPTION OF ‘SILENT SPRING’.” Feminist Studies 27, no. 3: 733.

April 12, 2014
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Explore the World With Global Road Warrior

Summer Residence of the King of Thailand

Summer Residence of the King of Thailand

Are you travelling the world this summer? Or do you just wish you were? Either way, April’s database of the month, Global Road Warrior is an informative, and dare I say- fun database for you to explore.

Global Road Warrior was created by the World Trade Press, a company devoted to providing up-to-date information and media to researchers, travelers, educators, and professionals. Their hope is to facilitate better global understanding.

Global Road Warrior accomplishes this with a great breadth of knowledge and information about most of the world’s nations. This database includes information about business culture, travel tips, security briefing, human rights reports, popular recipes, translations of common words and phrases into 36 languages.

There are a few ways to search this database. Selecting a specific country from the drop-down list or finding it on the world map will probably be most useful for most of your needs. Once you are on a country’s page you will find information about the land, people, history, and current condition of the nation in question- with a sidebar where you will find links to much more information.

From the homepage you can also search for words or phrases in one particular page or across the entire database. The later could be useful if you have a very specific phrase that you’d like to compare across nations- but it usually returns too many results.

Although a few smaller island nations seem to be excluded, Global Road Warrior has no small amount of information on 176 countries from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe. With Global Road Warrior, you can pretend you’re traveling the world even if you can’t afford it- and doesn’t that sound like more fun than yet another Netflix marathon?

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