April 16, 2019
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8th Annual International Edible Book Festival

On April 1st 2019, the Jennie King Mellon Library held its 8th Annual International Edible Book Festival, co-sponsored by Chatham University’s Food Studies Program. The entries were delightfully creative and absolutely delicious. And while every year we are impressed with the Edible Book creations submitted by participants, we were extra blown away this year. The competition was incredibly tough! We saw 12 Edible Book creations and enjoyed record breaking attendance with over 50 folks joining us for some yummy fun!

Family fun at the JKM Library’s 8th Annual International Edible Book Festival

The event was held in the Jennie King Mellon Library lobby. Our planning committee included Reference and Outreach Librarian Jocelyn Codner and food studies graduate student Jordan Mason, with support from Falk School Administrative Assistant Hallie Jensen. Hallie is always a huge help during the logistical planning of this event.

The International Edible Book Festival is an event celebrated in libraries around the world. It began in 2000 by two women who wanted to combine love for literature with love for food and cooking. It is traditionally celebrated on or around April 1st in honor of French gastronome Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin.

Folks who decide to submit an Edible Book select a favorite book, or perhaps just a book that sparks inspiration, and they craft a food item or beverage that creatively interprets and represents that book! A few ways to accomplish this could be in a clever name (puns encouraged), the way the food item is decorated, the ingredients in the food item, or perhaps by featuring a particular food item that was featured in the book itself. The result is fun, delicious, and literary. Participants bring their Edible Books to the event, and attendees and judges get to taste and judge each entry!

JKM Library book display featuring food writing, cookbooks, and more to celebrate Edible Books.

At our Edible Book Festival, we offer five prize categories:

  • Most Sustainable (ingredients must be clearly marked as being organic, local, sustainable, etc)
  • Most Creative Literary Interpretation
  • Best Tasting
  • Crowd’s Choice
  • Grand Prize

This year’s official judges included Assistant Professor Marc Nieson and Archivist and Public Services Librarian Molly Tighe, who both have volunteered to judge in previous years, and new judge Assistant Professor Sarah Shotland. They selected the winners of Most Sustainable, Most Creative Literary Interpretation, Best Tasting, and the Grand Prize. The 50+ attendees all voted on Crowd’s Choice. Keep scrolling to see who the big winners were and what kind of amazing Edible Books were submitted this year!

This year’s amazing judges, (left to right) Sarah Shotland, Marc Nieson, and Molly Tighe

“Call Me by Your Bundo” by Erica Cohen and Sarah Fink.

Most Sustainable Winners Erica Cohen and Sarah Fink for “Call Me by Your Bundo”.

“Make Room! Make Room!” by Dan Nolting

Most Creative Literary Interpretation winner Dan Nolting for “Make Room! Make Room!”

“Game of Scones” By Kate Emory

Best Tasting winner Kate Emory for “Game of Scones”

“Jack and the Beanstalk” by Suhui Dong and Yuchun Tung

Crowd’s Choice winners Suhui Dong and Yuchun Tung for “Jack and the Beanstalk”

“Dune” by Sarah Birmingham

Grand Prize winner Sarah Birmingham for “Dune”

Our Most Sustainable winner was “Call Me by Your Bundo” by Erica Cohen and Sarah Fink. This Edible Book played off of the books Call Me by Your Name by Andre Aciman and A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo by Jill Twiss, illustrated by E.G. Keller (presented by Last Week Tonight with John Oliver). It was a playfully decorated carrot cake that won for it’s sustainable ingredients and it’s socially sustainable message. Our Most Creative Literary Interpretation was “Make Room! Make Room!” by Dan Nolting, which drew its inspiration from the book Make Room! Make Room! by Harry Harrison (later turned into the 1973 science fiction film Soylent Green). Dan created a multimedia experience with his scifi steam-punk Edible Book that included a looping video with sound to accompany his lime coconut jello shots. The Best Tasting award went to “Game of Scones” by Kate Emory, obviously inspired by A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire #1) by George R. R. Martin. This Edible Book featured scones with four different delicious flavor profiles to represent four major families in the book series. The winner’s of the Crowd’s Choice award was “Jack and the Beanstalk” by Suhui Dong and Yuchun Tung for their stunning crepe cake flavored with matcha, rum, and red bean paste decorated with candy meringues and adorable illustrations and figures. And finally, the Grand Prize was awarded to Sarah Birmingham for “Dune”, inspired by the science fiction novel Dune (Dune #1) by Frank Herbert. Sarah’s Edible Book involved handmade pumpkin sherbet (pun intended), handmade cinnamon beignets, and (most impressively) handmade chai gummy worms!

Our 2019 winners!

Click through the gallery to see additional Edible Book entries and more photos from the festivities! We hope this inspires you to join us next spring for our 9th Annual International Edible Book Festival.

November 14, 2018
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First Annual Day of the Dead Celebration!

The touching and insightful Disney Pixar film Coco pushed the Day of the Dead to the front of popular culture in the United States last year, but this celebration has been around for thousands of years in one form or another. The Day of the Dead is an established international holiday that can trace its roots back to indigenous traditions in the Americas and the Catholicism brought by the Spanish and other Europeans. Continue reading to hear about Chatham’s celebration of the holiday and see images of our ofrenda.

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April 4, 2018
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Archives Exhibit “Nature & Nurture: The Rachel Carson Legacy in Pittsburgh” on view at Heinz Hall

In conjunction with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra’s upcoming performance of Silent Spring, a symphonic tone poem created to honor the 50th anniversary of the publication of the seminal Rachel Carson book, the Chatham University Archives is presenting an exhibit titled Nature & Nurture: The Rachel Carson Legacy in Pittsburgh.  On view in Heinz Hall from April 6 through April 22, the exhibition presents highlights from the collections of the University Archives that explore the roots of Rachel Carson’s interest in science and writing and the legacy of celebrating her achievements though music.

Chatham Archives exhibit Nature & Nurture: The Rachel Carson Legacy in Pittsburgh at Heinz Hall

Widely recognized for The Sea Around Us, Silent Spring, and countless articles that brought attention to the detrimental effects of widespread pesticide use, Rachel Carson’s connection to music isn’t frequently discussed.  However, music played a major role in Rachel’s upbringing, as her mother taught piano lessons to local children in the family home and many days were spent setting Mother Goose rhymes to music.

Nature & Nurture exhibit essay in Pittsburgh Symphony Concert Program

Rachel remained a classical music fan throughout her lifetime, even writing liner notes for the National Symphony Orchestra’s recording of Claude Debussy’s Le Mer and speaking at an orchestra benefit luncheon.  As a student at Chatham (then Pennsylvania Female College), Rachel evoked the sound of piano music in her literary club award winning essay, Broken Lamps.  This essay is available online through the University Archives at this link.

Nature & Nurture exhibit from University Archives in Heinz Hall

The exhibition, Nature & Nurture: The Rachel Carson Legacy in Pittsburgh, spans Rachel Carson’s experience as a student and a few of the local, musical  events that have honored her work as an environmental pioneer.  The display includes photographs, programs, and documents from the 1995 Opus: Earth symphony concert to benefit the Rachel Carson Institute and the World Wildlife Fund.

Opus: Earth Program Cover

Of particular note is a score to Silent Spring inscribed “in honor of Rachel Carson to her Alma Mater Chatham University” by the composer, Steven Stucky.  The score was presented during an on-campus discussion of his piece and the legacy of Rachel Carson in 2011.

Score for “Silent Spring” inscribed to Chatham by composer Steven Stucky

The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra is generously offering discount codes for students, staff, faculty, and alums.  Contact Student Affairs for more information.  You won’t want to miss the special pre-concert lecture by Dr. Patricia DeMarco, former head of the Rachel Carson Institute and our region’s foremost Rachel Carson scholar.  Dr. DeMarco’s lecture will occur on Friday, April 20, 2018.

Can make the event?  Check out the finding aid for the Collection on Rachel Carson or contact the Chatham University Archives & Special Collections to learn more about Rachel Carson `29 and her local legacy.

March 28, 2018
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7th Annual International Edible Book Festival: Read ‘Em and Eat!

Another year, another AMAZING Edible Book Festival! The International Edible Book Festival is a celebration of food and literature, combining both into tasty fun! This year, we had an incredible variety of sweet and savory dishes ranging from cleverly simple to technically impressive. There was also liberal usage of props, much to our delight! It was exciting, to say the least. The event was again co-sponsored by the Food Studies Program and hosted in the Jennie King Mellon Library lobby. Our planning committee included Reference and Outreach Librarian Jocelyn Codner and Food Studies students Lore Pinder and Rachel Waugh.

Participants select a favorite book, or perhaps just a book that sparks inspiration, and they craft a food item or beverage that creatively interprets and represents that book! A few ways to accomplish this could be in a clever name (puns encouraged), the way the food item is decorated, the ingredients in the food item, or perhaps that particular food item was featured in the book. The result is a fun and delicious Edible Book. Participants bring their Books to the event, and lucky attendees get to taste and judge each entry!

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October 6, 2017
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Chatham Leadership: A Presidential Timeline

Chatham Leadership:
A Presidential Timeline

The Chatham University Archives invites you to explore Chatham Leadership: A Presidential Timeline, a chronology and account of the remarkable individuals who have shaped Chatham and made it the institution it is today.

President Spencer Inauguration, 1935

Founded in 1869 by Reverend William Trimble Beatty and supporters from the Shadyside Presbyterian Church, the Pennsylvania Female College actualized the growing sentiment of the times that women—and therefore society—benefited intellectually, socially, and morally from a liberal arts education that had commonly been limited to men.

Rather than offering courses in needlework, china painting, and English, as other women’s schools in Pittsburgh had throughout the 18th and 19th centuries, the Pennsylvania Female College offered courses in astronomy, chemistry, Greek, and other rigorous subjects that prepared women for professional careers.

Over the next 148 years, the school changed names, first to Pennsylvania College for Women then to Chatham College (now Chatham University), and welcomed generations of students, faculty, and leaders dedicated to creating a productive and conscientious society through liberal arts education. The 21st century brought the Falk School of Sustainability, Eden Hall Campus, undergraduate coeducation, and Chatham’s 16th President, Dr. David Finegold.

Buckets and Blossoms, 2017

The Chatham University Archives and the JKM Library congratulate Dr. Finegold on his inauguration as he joins a historic lineage of Chatham leaders.  We welcome the Chatham community to take a look back to the history of our school and the men and women who have served as its leader.  Explore this lineage below and through materials on display in the lobby of the JKM Library.

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March 31, 2017
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Prizewinning Edible Books

Our 6th annual celebration of the International Edible Book Festival was a really fun event! If you missed it, here are the highlights.

We had three fantastic judges

Dr. Carrie Tippen, Dr. Heather McNaugher, & Sophie Slesinger

who, after some very serious deliberation,

selected four of our five prizewinning edible books:

Best Tasting
Maryem Aslam, Harry Potter
(chocolate oreo ball snitches)

 

Most Sustainable
Molly Tighe, Seitanic VS
(Satanic Verses)

Most Creative Literary Interpretation
Kate Emory, Julius Caesar

Grand Prize:
Amy Lee Heinlen, A Good Man is Hard to Find

The final prize was determined by the attendees, who voted for their favorite book. The winner of this popular vote prize was:

Maria, Trump: The Art of the Deal

Everyone seemed to have a great time and the library lobby was packed:

Want to see ALL the books submitted? Check out the pictures on our Facebook page!

Also, fun fact: The Wikipedia page for the Edible Book Festival has featured a book from our 2012 event since April 2013 (and we didn’t add it!)! We’re famous!

If you missed this year’s event, don’t worry! There’s always next year, and you can even start planning your entry now. All Chatham students, staff, and faculty are invited to submit an edible book.

March 14, 2017
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You’re Invited: International Edible Book Festival

FREE FOOD! FABULOUS PRIZES!

It’s the event you’ve been waiting for all year. Or perhaps the event you didn’t even realize you’d been waiting for!

Join us for Chatham’s 6th annual celebration of the International Edible Book Festival! Wednesday, March 29th from 4:30-5:30 in the Lobby of the JKM Library.

What’s an edible book, you ask? It’s up to you! It may be food that looks like a book:

Food that was described or consumed by characters in a book:

A fun interpretation of the title of a book:

And whatever else you might think of!

Full details of the event can be found in the Chatham Happenings. Please join us – create your own book to enter for a chance to win one of 5 amazing prizes! Or just come for the free food and to vote for your favorite.

Hope to see you there!

February 21, 2017
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JKM Library Resources on Black Panther Party

Wasn’t Khalid Raheem’s Black History Month Lunch & Learn lecture today so thought-provoking?  Did it make you curious about some of the books, events, individuals, and organizations that played a role in the history of the Black Panther party?  It made us curious and we’re pleased to let you know that many of the topics discussed can be investigated further at the JKM Library.

For one, the JKM Library has available for check-out the George Jackson book, Soledad Brother: The Prison Letters of George Jackson.  Mr. Raheem’s description of Mr. Jackson’s role in the Revolutionary Prison movement was compelling and this primary source resource provides a direct view of the activist’s experiences.  Click here to find the book in the JKM Library catalog.

Huey Newton, whom Mr. Raheem discussed in relation to the effect of imprisonment had on the eventual splintering of the Black Panther Party, is also well represented in the JKM Library collection.  Click here to listen in on Huey Newton’s conversation with Erik Erikson. There are many more volumes in the JKM collections that discuss the history and legacy of the Black Panther Party and the JKM Library staff are always happy to help you find even more resources in our collections.

In fact, we were thrilled to hear Mr. Raheem discuss the Black Panther Party in Pittsburgh and in Philadelphia because we have a brand, new resource that makes Pennsylvania history research even easier!  To search through online databases of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (from 1786 – 1985) and the Philadelphia Enquirer (from 1860 – 2001), just click “P” on the Databases A-Z tab and select the newspaper of your choice.  From here, you can find lots of articles about the history of the Black Panther Party in our region.

We’re only scratching the surface of the resources available in this post, so stop by the JKM Library and let us know if you’d like to dig a little deeper.  We’re always happy to help!

Thanks to the Office of Student Affairs for bringing to Chatham such a compelling speaker and social activist!

 

 

April 2, 2015
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Prizewinning Edible Books!

Yesterday’s celebration of the International Edible Books Festival was a rousing success! Thanks to everyone who participated. IMG_4809

Thank you also to our three wonderful judges for their hard work in selecting the prizewinning edible books:

  • Dr. Heather McNaugher, Associate Professor of English & Creative Writing
  • Malik Hamilton, Food Studies student
  • Amy Lee Heinlen, Librarian and Poet
IMG_4796

Serious deliberation was required to select the prizewinners.

And a big congratulations, of course, to our fantastic prizewinners:

Most Creative Literary Interpretation:
Molly Tighe for Tender is the NightMost Creative Ingredients / Use of Ingredients:
Shuai Lu for Ancient Egypt: The Land and its Legacy
IMG_1211

Most Sustainable:
Breanne Healey for The Very Hungry Caterpillar
IMG_4774

Most Popular Vote:
Rachel Geffrey for Curious George
IMG_4777

Grand Prize:
Tiffany Waltenbaugh, Teresa Scibilia, & Lorraine Yanjtovich for The Very Hungry Caterpillar
IMG_1209

June 5, 2014
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Jerry Caplan 1923-2004

Jerry Caplan (1923-2004) waCaplans a Pittsburgh native and a beloved artists in the community.  His art career begin in the US Army as a member of the 84th Engineer Battalion where he and other artists constructed dummy boats, planes, and tanks as military camouflage.  After the war he was employed in the pipe industry, manufacturing large clay pipes.  Here Caplan gained inspiration for pipe sculptures and ceramics, which led to the creation of some of his seminal works.  Such works include Metamorphosis, a sculpture on the Chatham University campus located outside Mellon Hall.

Caplan greatly contributed to the Chatham community.  He was a well-loved art professor who inspired students and faculty alike.  He believed “the purpose of teaching…should be to help the student first, to think creatively, second, to see rather than just to look, third.”

Professor Jerry Caplan’s life and achievements are currently featured in a University Archives display on the first floor of the Jennie King Mellon Library.  The display includes one case devoted to a sketchbook and photographs of Caplan with Chatham students.  A second case focuses on Caplan’s military experiences and includes photographs and an excerpt from his unpublished memoir.  The final case highlights publications that discuss Caplan’s devotion to teaching and his creative work.

Jerry Caplan, 1979

This display complements the current exhibition in the Chatham Art Gallery, Jerry Caplan and Donna Hollen Bolmgren: Partners in Art.  The exhibition opens tomorrow, June 5th, for Reunion Weekend and runs through August 22nd.  Featured are works of art in the Chatham University Art Collection, including self-portraits and other subjects in oil, drawings in charcoal and pastel, handmade paper, and sculpture in ceramic and plaster.

Following the close of the exhibit, materials from the collection will remain accessible through the Chatham University Archives & Special Collections.  A full finding aid for the collection is accessible here and here.  The Chatham University Archives & Special Collections welcomes researchers and research visits by the general public, artists, students, and faculty.

 

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