International Education Week: November 12-16th, 2018

International Education week is an opportunity to celebrate the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide. This joint initiative of the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Department of Education promotes programs that prepare Americans for a global environment and attract future leaders from abroad to study, learn and exchange experiences.

Students, international and domestic, are encouraged to participate in the events scheduled during this week. At the events, international and domestic students can communicate with one another and learn facets of one another’s’ culture and make new friends.

On Monday November 12th, the Office of International Affairs partnered with the Chatham University Modern Language Department for “International Karaoke.” Offered each semester, this popular events brings together students to sing in Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Spanish, as well as other languages.

Students in the Modern Language classes are able to practice by singing in their target languages. With well over 100 in attendance, International Education Week started on a high note.

On November 13th, students were invited to the international conversation hour, in the Mellon solarium. The international conversation hour provides topics for students to discuss in order to develop understanding of each other’s cultures.

Later that evening, the Chatham University Vira Heinz Scholars presented on “American Abroad: Social Identity and Positionality in a Global and Domestic Environment.” Students, Miranda Boyden (studied in Italy), Janelle Moore (Costa Rica), Erion Morton (Japan) and Kaylee Spitak (Japan) studied in the summer of 2018 with support from the Vira I Heinz Program for Women in Global Leadership. The VIH program “prepares women for tomorrow’s global challenges by offering a unique opportunity for international experiences, leadership development and community service.” Students receive $5000+ scholarship for an international educational experience.

The Chatham 2018 CEE, American Abroad: Social Identity and Positionality in a Global and Domestic Environment involved roundtable discussions around social identity and its impact on students’ experiences at home and abroad.

Thursday November 14th was a cold and rainy day for trivia! OIA hosted the International Jeopardy contest in the Carriage House, and tested students’ knowledge of world history, geography, and global facts.

With quite of few interested in playing, students played in teams of three to pool their knowledge.  With challenging questions, such as “Which country lists internet access as a human right?”, students played through five categories. Though last coming into final Jeopardy, Team Brazil, won with a high bet, and the correct answer. Students Dylan Jacquard, Vinni Muniz, and Mana Soda claimed the title of International Jeopardy Champs!

The final event for International Education week was a welcome respite from biting cold. On the day of the first snow of Fall 2018, the staff of the Office of International Affairs met students both local and international to celebrate diversity with a hot cup of tea. The International tea party included flavors from the strong and bitter Irish breakfast to the mellow sweetness of tropical mango and chocolate. This helped warming the attendees and made the conversation flow, everything from food, to internships, to study abroad, to difference between the United States and other countries was discussed.

Many students coming and going from class also stopped by to join conversation and enjoy a hot beverage.

Over the course of IEW, Chatham students across campus were able to engage in international and intercultural learning.

Chatham’s Dynamic US Culture & Cinema Course

A large screen glows in the pitch-dark classroom. It is eerily quiet.

Someone yells, “Don’t go in there!”

Others frantically chime in.

I peek around the screen on my podium to see 23 transfixed students, wide-eyed and hands covering mouths.

On the screen, the ceiling explodes. An alien tumbles onto the floor as scientists and soldiers scream as they scramble for safety.

Screams ricochet in our room, followed by nervous laughter.

This is US Culture and Cinema, a 100-level culture-based course that students take to learn about American culture, values, traditions and so much more through the lens of top ten classic American films.

Pre-reading activities include summaries, background information handouts and short video clips.

For each film, post-reading entails heavy discussions and a set of carefully crafted handouts designed to get students to reflect and synthesize information they’ve learned. Each handout builds upon their understanding and skills, starting with formulating their opinion, close critical reading, and summary honing. Film synopses are gapfill with word banks, giving students a chance to understand the story while they learn practical academic and technical vocab. Another handout doles out juicy film trivia followed by lively discussions in which they justify their favorite items. Same for quotes and film excerpts—with these they explain the humor, or infer why the character says something, and they act out parts of scenes as intoned in the film. There is a vocab match with words, phrases, and idioms and images. The Best Summaries has them choose the best summary out of 5 or 6 similar film genre summaries, specific character names removed.

While they actively watch the film, they follow along while completing questions with multiple choice answers. Questions are kept as simple as possible to prevent students from missing important moments. Images of the main characters are shown on this handout, along with images and maps of ideas or places at the end. The While You Watch questions and answers are designed to help students follow along with ease an otherwise potentially confusing film.

Each week, I send short video clips related to the film, director, film theory, and technical elements such as angles & shots and sound used in the film for them to watch and take notes for discussion. They then discuss the ideas they found most interesting and explain why. Class participation is typically very lively.

I have 3 criteria for choosing films. It should reflect American culture, values, traditions, and/or social issues. The film should also be a little older so that there is less chance of students having seen it. And finally, it should be in the top 10 or 20 for its genre.

This semester we watched Kramer vs Kramer (Drama), Singin’ in the Rain (Musical), Rear Window (Thriller), The Shining (Horror), The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (Western), Aliens (Sci-fi/Action), Big (Comedy).

by: Sylvia Shipp, English Language Program Lecturer & Student Advisor

 

Updates from the International Student Services offices

 

Traveling over winter break? Be prepared!

Study in the States, the official website for international students in the US has released their tips for students planning to travel over winter break. This information is helpful for international travel, regardless on when you go.

  1. Meet with your designated school official (DSO).

The DSO will confirm your student status and sign your I-20 for Travel authorization. They will confirm your current address, contact information, and enrollment.

  1. Don’t forget all the required documents for travel!

Remember to take your passport, valid student visa, and your form I-20 when you travel. Make sure these documents are kept close at hand, and not put in checked baggage. It may also be a good idea to bring a copy of your enrollment verification- which you can print from your MyChatham account.

  1. What if you receive a Form I-515A?

First, don’t panic! The Form I-515A is issued by Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) if you are missing required documentation. It allows you to entire the US for 30-days in order to obtain and submit the missing documentation. If you receive a Form I-515A, contact your DSO immediately.

Read the full article at Study in the States .

Study in Japan, Summer 2019: Japanese Language Immersion Course (JLIC) at Doshisha Women’s College

The summer program at Doshisha Women’s College (DWCLA) in Japan offers female undergraduate students who have at least half a year Japanese study experience:

  • Japanese language courses in two levels
  • Japanese cultural experiences, field trips, club visits, and other interactive programs with DWCLA students

Course Dates:

  • Term A: May 20th to June 14th, 2019
  • Term B: June 24 to July 19th, 2019

Features of the JLIC include:

  • small class sizes
  • entry level students are welcome
  • field trips in Kyoto
  • intercultural communication sessions with DWCLA students
  • two accommodation options – off-campus dorms or homestay

How to apply and Application forms:

http://www.dwc.doshisha.ac.jp/english/international_exchange/

Applications due by February 28, 2019.  For more information, contact internationalaffairs@chatham.edu.

 

Apply for a Fulbright Summer Institute in the UK

London, England

Are you a first year or sophomore student looking for a funded summer study abroad experience in the UK?  Consider applying for this Fulbright opportunity.  Application deadline is 2/6/2019.

There are several UK Summer Institutes available every year. Each Institute is hosted by a different university, and each focus on a specific historical or cultural context, or a subject or topic. You do not need to be familiar with these to apply and are encouraged to explore your interests.

The best applications are from well-rounded students who can demonstrate:

  • Strong academic ability
  • Ambassadorial skills
  • Intercultural sensitivity
  • Genuine desire to learn more about the UK and to share aspects of American culture
  • Extracurricular activities
  • Community involvement
  • Leadership potential
  • Plans to further the Fulbright mission and give back to the US upon returning
Giant’s Causeway, outside Belfast

Applying

Applications for 2019 Institutes are open now through 6 February at 5pm EST.

  1. Read the FAQs and terms and conditions
  2. Read our Privacy Policy for applicants
  3. Apply online and upload a transcript to the application form as a PDF (official transcripts are preferred)
  4. Select two (2) references and place their e-mail addresses into the application. They should receive a notification message that will lead them to their own online portal to submit a reference letter.

The application form must be completed, with transcript attached, and submitted before the deadline. Your references should also submit your letters before the deadline or your application will be incomplete.  An application will not be considered completed if any of these items are missing or submitted late.

Bristol, England

Interviews

Finalists will be invited to interview in late March. Summer Institute interviews are by video conference call and can only be rescheduled under extreme circumstances.

 For more information or other study abroad opportunities, contact the Office of International Affairs, internationalaffairs@chatham.edu or visit us, Falk Hall, lower level.

Chatham University

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